Warblers at Whitnall Park in Milwaukee Wisconsin on May 22, 2017

Stopping at Whitnall Park this morning provided some nice views of some stunning warblers. The hardest to locate today was the Mourning Warbler, you can assume it is around as it had been seen, but showed itself the least. On a few occasions it came out of the log jam and I captured a few shots, but the shows were very short lived and it was usually on the move getting gnats. A Gray Catbird chased it out of the area a few times from the log jam, but it soon returned after a while as it popped out again from the sticks and logs. Other warblers species seen were Chestnut-sided, Magnolia, Blackpoll, American Redstart, Wilson’s and Canadas. One is always hoping for more species, but this was fun and for the most part there were numerous of each species. It was a fun time with great birds and friends! Some sun but mostly cloudy skies with mild temps. Images were taken on May 21-22, 2017.

Mourning Warbler, male

Wilson’s Warbler, male

Canada Warbler, male

Mourning Warbler, male

Chestnut-sided Warbler, female

Wilson’s Warbler, male

Mourning Warbler, male

Canada Warbler, male

Magnolia Warbler, female

Canada Warbler, male

Wilson’s Warbler, male

Blackpoll Warbler, male

American Redstart, male

American Redstart, male

American Redstart, male

Wilson’s Warbler, male

Canada Warbler, male

Chestnut-sided Warbler, female

Mourning Warbler, male

Mourning Warbler, male

Chestnut-sided Warbler, female

Rose-breasted Grosbeak

Warblers at Whitnall Park in Milwaukee Wisconsin on May 11, 2017

I had been stopping at numerous warbler locations this week getting ready for the big surge of warblers and it really has not happened yet. I stopped at Whitnall Park and there was some nice warbler action but only a few species. Chestnut-sided, Magnolia, Black-and-white, Yellow-rumped, Palm and Prothonotary which I did a blog post on yesterday. Here are a few images I captured while this burst lasted as today, the 12th of May, a warbler could hardly be found. Where are they all some ask? I think they are still coming. These images were taken on May 11, 2017 on a beautiful day with great friends too!

Chestnut-sided Warbler

Black-and-white Warbler

Black-and-white Warbler

Magnolia Warbler

Chestnut-sided Warbler

Palm Warbler

Chestnut-sided Warbler

Black-and-white Warbler

Magnolia Warbler

Black-and-white Warbler

Chestnut-sided Warbler

Gray Catbird

Gray Catbird

Prothonotary Warbler at Whitnall Park in Milwaukee Wisconsin on May 11, 2017

My first stop this morning was Whitnall Park hoping for some warblers. It seems like it takes forever for good numbers to arrive. One of the first warblers seen this morning was a Prothonotary, male. It was a stunning bird and gave nice views most of the morning. I have seen them in the past but this one put on some nice shows feeding. Other warblers present, Chestnut-sided, Magnolia, Black-and-White, Yellow-rumped, American Redstart, and some Palms. Other birds to note, White-eyed and Blue-headed Vireos. It was a fun day out with friends and meeting some new ones too! Finally, a mild day with warmer temps and mostly sunny skies, no wind there. Images were taken on May 11, 2017.

Singing away this morning…

Going for a gnat!

Getting the gnat!

Looking for the next gnat…

Looking around for a gnat…

Going for a gnat!

Townsend’s Warbler at Kewaunee in Kewaunee County Wisconsin on December 9, 2016

I made the trip up to Kewaunee this morning with hopes to see the very rare visitor to Wisconsin, the Townsend’s Warbler. It has been visiting a feeder in a yard there for at least a week now. It is not seen often but visits daily. This bird is a 1st year female. The host Pam S. has many feeders in her yard and this is one of the places this bird visits. I say that as her sister lives 5 blocks away, this bird also visits her feeder too, along with many feeders that can be seen looking up and down the street. A small group of us showed up at the start of the day today which visitors are not allowed till 10:00 am thru 4:00 pm. Surprisingly the bird had stopped in the early morning but showed briefly at about 10:05 am. We all got looks, but images were a different story with his brief visit. Most left but Jay W and I hung around till noon. As I started heading to my car about 12:02, Jay yelled, it is back. We both got nice views and a few shots as it took a drink at the heated bird bath in the yard. This bird has been eating seeds at the feeders. The visit was brief again, we thought it headed up into a large spruce tree on the property. We were both happy with what we got, very cold and headed out. I heard this was the 6th Wisconsin state record for this species, a western bird far from it’s normal range of the north American west coast. What a stunning bird! A big thank you to Pam S. for sharing this amazing bird with the birding community. With very cold temps coming in the state and a big snow blanket coming along with that it will be interesting to see how long it hangs around. An awesome life bird that I just did not think I would be getting anytime soon, but as birding goes, one never really knows. Weather was high in the mid 20’s, some sun with clouds and a lot of north wind, very cold! If visiting for this bird, Pam asks that you view from the driveway. Images were taken on December 9, 2016.

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Townsend’s Warbler

Binomial name: Dendroica townsendi

Category: Wood-Warblers

Size: 5” long, 8” wing span

Weight: 0.31 oz

Getting a drink

Getting a drink

The gulp

The gulp

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Back view

Back view

Townsend's Warbler inside the feeder looking out to the right

Townsend’s Warbler inside the feeder looking out to the right, with an American Goldfinch in front

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Just another shot of this cool bird!

Kirtland’s Warbler in Adams County Wisconsin on May 27, 2016

I decided to do some searching for a Kirtland’s Warbler in Adams County Wisconsin on May 27, 2016. I had some luck along side a road where a male was singing away. No calls were used in obtaining these images and the images were taken from the road in an area where habitat looked good for this species to breed. Distant images were taken on May 27, 2016.

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Kirtland’s Warbler

Binomial name: Dendroica kirtlandii

Category: Wood Warblers

Size: 5.75” long, 8.75” wing span

Weight: .48 oz

Cool facts: Through effort this bird is recovering well from once low numbers. This species requires large tracks of land for breeding with sizes comprising of 160 acres or more. Habitat they prefer is dense young jack pine.

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Warblers at Whitnall Park in Milwaukee Wisconsin on May 14, 2016

Whitnall Park this morning was up and down with warbler species. Pockets of them, as probably the same as pockets of bugs present. No large numbers but things were hoping at times. Species I seen today were Yellow, Magnolia, American Redstarts, Wilson’s, Canada, Yellow-rumped, Common Yellowthroat, Black and White, Nashville, Blackburnian, Palm and Chestnut-sided. It was a cold cloudy day, with low 40’s, steady winds with light sleet at times. Felt like winter! Images were taken on May 14, 2016.

Canada Warbler, male

Canada Warbler, male

Canada Warbler, male, getting a bug

Canada Warbler, male, getting a bug

Canada Warbler, male

Canada Warbler, male looking for the bug

Canada Warbler, male, looking for the bug

Canada Warbler, male, looking for the bug

Black and White Warbler, male

Black and White Warbler, male

Chestnut-sided Warbler, female

Chestnut-sided Warbler, female

Chestnut-sided Warbler, female, calling

Chestnut-sided Warbler, female, calling

Chestnut-sided Warbler, female

Chestnut-sided Warbler, female

Chestnut-sided Warbler, male

Chestnut-sided Warbler, male

American Redstart, male

American Redstart, male

American Redstart, male

American Redstart, male

American Redstart, male, with a bug

American Redstart, male, with a bug

American Redstart, female

American Redstart, female

Common Yellowthroat, male

Common Yellowthroat, male

Yellow Warbler, male

Yellow Warbler, male

Warblers and more at Whitnall Park in Milwaukee Wisconsin on May 13, 2016

This morning I decided to take a run to Whitnall Park in Milwaukee to see if anything was going on with warblers. Warblers had some nice species (14), but in low numbers on each. Warbler species I saw were Prothonotary, Wilson’s, Magnolia, American Redstart, Black and White, Yellow-rumped, Nashville, Northern Parula, Golden-winged, Chestnut-sided, Yellow, Palm, Canada, Common Yellowthroat and Black-throated Blue. Prothonotary was the highlight and Magnolia’s were the most popular. I heard Baltimore Orioles singing all day long. Also present was a Philadelphia Vireo along with common species we are seeing this time of year. Started out mostly sunny, mild temps turning to more clouds in the afternoon. Trees in some places there are leafed out full creating more shade and more places for the birds to be harder to see. It was a challenge today. It was a fun day out with birders and photographers. Images were taken on May 13, 2016.

Prothonotary Warbler

Prothonotary Warbler

Prothonotary Warbler

Prothonotary Warbler

Prothonotary Warbler

Prothonotary Warbler

Prothonotary Warbler

Prothonotary Warbler

Black-throated Blue

Black-throated Blue Warbler

Magnolia

Magnolia Warbler

Yellow Warbler

Yellow Warbler

Yellow Warbler

Yellow Warbler

Magnolia Warbler

Magnolia Warbler Warbler

Magnolia Warbler

Magnolia Warbler

Nashville Warbler

Nashville Warbler

Baltimore Oriole what appears to be putting the first string around the possible start of a nest

Baltimore Oriole what appears to be starting the construction of a new nest, see the fine white string?

Philadelphia Vireo

Philadelphia Vireo

Prothonotary Warbler

Prothonotary Warbler

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Prothonotary Warbler

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Prothonotary Warbler

Black-capped Chickadee getting a bug out of a bloom

Black-capped Chickadee getting a bug out of a bloom

Prothonotary Warbler at Whitnall Park in Franklin Wisconsin on May 12, 2015

I made a stop at Whitnall Park mid-morning today to see what was going on with the warblers. It was slow for warblers with like it has been in the past, just 1 and 2 of a few species, no big fallout. I ran into Bruce and he had viewed 2 Prothonotary Warblers earlier near the big waterfall. As we spent some time waiting for things to pick up, a Prothonotary Warbler made a brief appearance near the board walk below the dam. It continually feed during it’s brief appearance and then disappeared. It was windy, cloudy and cold, but seeing a Prothonotary Warbler always makes a bird trip worth it. Other warbler species viewed today, Golden-winged, Black-throated Blue (f), Magnolia, Chestnut-sided, Black and White, American Redstart, and brief looks at a Bay-breasted. Images of the Prothonotary Warbler feeding were taken on May 12, 2015.

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Prothonotary Warbler at Whitnall Park in Franklin Wisconsin on May 10, 2015

I stopped by Whitnall Park this morning for a couple hours. It was a cloudy day with a couple rain drops on occasion with cool temps and a little wind. A couple of the highlight warblers were brief views of a stunning golden-yellow male Prothonotary Warbler and male Bay-breasted Warbler. Some of the other warbler species present were Blackburnian, Yellow, Black-throated Blue, Black and White, Palm, Canada, Magnolia, Chestnut-sided, Northern Waterthrush, Common Yellowthroat and American Redstart. Fun couple of hours watching these warblers feed at a fast pace today. Images were taken on May 10, 2015.

Prothonotary Warbler

Prothonotary Warbler with a bug

Prothonotary Warbler with a bug

Prothonotary Warbler with a bug

Prothonotary Warbler

Prothonotary Warbler looking through the leaves for bugs

Prothonotary Warbler feeding

Prothonotary Warbler feeding

Prothonotary Warbler going through the leaves for bugs

Prothonotary Warbler going through the leaves for bugs

Prothonotary Warbler

Prothonotary Warbler

Prothonotary Warbler calling!

Prothonotary Warbler calling!

Prothonotary Warbler

Prothonotary Warbler

Prothonotary Warbler going for a bug

Prothonotary Warbler going for a bug!

Bay-breasted Warbler

Bay-breasted Warbler

Bay-breasted Warbler

Bay-breasted Warbler

Bay-breasted Warbler

Bay-breasted Warbler

Canada Warbler

Canada Warbler

Black-throated Blue Warbler, female

Black-throated Blue Warbler, female

Black-throated Blue Warbler, female

Black-throated Blue Warbler, female

Black-throated Blue Warbler, female

Black-throated Blue Warbler, female

Black and White Warbler with a bug!

Black and White Warbler with a bug!

Black and White Warbler with another bug!

Black and White Warbler with another bug!

Black and White Warbler

Black and White Warbler

Chestnut-sided Warbler

Chestnut-sided Warbler

Warblers at Whitnall Park in Franklin Wisconsin on May 8, 2015

I made a stop at  Whitnall  Park mid-morning to see what the action was like. It was another day of just a couple of warblers 1’s on 2’s of a few nice species. Species hanging around were a Wilson’s Warbler, a Canada Warbler for a few minutes, and a Black-throated Blue Warbler was still around. Also brief views of a Blackburnian Warbler, Yellow Warbler, Chestnut-sided Warbler, Bay-breasted Warbler, Black and White Warbler, American Redstart, Nashville Warbler, Magnolia Warbler, Common Yellowthroat and Northern Waterthrush. A fun morning out with a nice group of birders on a morning of some clouds and sun with warm temps. Images were taken on May 8, 2015.

Blackburnian Warbler

Blackburnian Warbler

Wilson's Warbler

Wilson’s Warbler

Wilson's Warbler

Wilson’s Warbler

Wilson's Warbler

Wilson’s Warbler

Wilson's Warbler

Wilson’s Warbler

Wilson's Warbler going for a bug!

Wilson’s Warbler going for a bug!

Wilson's Warbler

Wilson’s Warbler

Canada Warbler

Canada Warbler

Canada Warbler

Canada Warbler

Black-throated Blue Warbler

Black-throated Blue Warbler

Black-throated Blue Warbler

Black-throated Blue Warbler

Yellow Warbler

Yellow Warbler

Yellow Warbler

Yellow Warbler

American Redstart

American Redstart calling!

American Redstart

American Redstart

American Redstart calling!

American Redstart calling!

Warblers at Whitnall Park in Franklin Wisconsin on May 6, 2015

I made a stop at Whitnall Park this morning to see if the warbler action had changed from yesterday. A few more species were present but that was about it. New today from since yesterday was Blackburnian Warbler, Black-throated Green Warbler, Northern Parula and the Wilson’s Warbler. The Black-throated Blue Warbler was still present on and off today. It was a nice day to be out with other birders and friends. Some sun and clouds with mild temps. Images were taken on May 6, 2015.

Black-throated Green Warbler

Black-throated Green Warbler

Black-throated Green Warbler

Black-throated Green Warbler

Blackburnian Warbler

Blackburnian Warbler

Swainson's Thrush

Swainson’s Thrush

Ruby-crowned Kinglet

Ruby-crowned Kinglet

Black-throated Blue Warbler

Black-throated Blue Warbler

Black-throated Blue Warbler

Black-throated Blue Warbler

Black-throated Blue Warbler

Black-throated Blue Warbler

Black-throated Blue Warbler

Black-throated Blue Warbler

Black and White Warbler

Black and White Warbler

Black and White Warbler

Black and White Warbler

Black and White Warbler

Black and White Warbler

Yellow-rumped Warbler

Magnolia Warbler

Warblers at Whitnall Park in Franklin Wisconsin on May 4, 2015

I stopped in at Whitnall Park this morning to check out the warbler action. Surprisingly I could only come up with 5 species and only 1’s and 2’s of each. A stunning Black-throated Blue was the highlight. Other warbler species present were American Redstart, Magnolia, Black and White, Palm and Yellow-rumps. FOY Rose-breasted Grosbeak was a treat along with what I am 99% sure a Tufted Titmouse. Nice morning to be out with mild temps and partly cloudy. Images were taken on May 5, 2015.

Black-throated Blue Warbler

Black-throated Blue Warbler

Black-throated Blue Warbler

Black-throated Blue Warbler

Black-throated Blue Warbler

Black-throated Blue Warbler

Black-throated Blue Warbler

Black-throated Blue Warbler

Black-throated Blue Warbler

Black-throated Blue Warbler

Black-throated Blue Warbler

Black-throated Blue Warbler

Black-throated Blue Warbler at the landing!

Black-throated Blue Warbler at the landing!

Black-throated Blue Warbler

Black-throated Blue Warbler

Black-throated Blue Warbler doing the call!

Black-throated Blue Warbler doing the call!

Black-throated Blue Warbler

Black-throated Blue Warbler

Black-throated Blue Warbler

Black-throated Blue Warbler looking at a bug!

Black-throated Blue Warbler, back view

Black-throated Blue Warbler, back view

American Redstart

American Redstart

American Redstart

American Redstart, calling!

American Redstart

American Redstart, calling!

American Redstart

American Redstart

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Magnolia Warbler

Magnolia Warbler

Magnolia Warbler

Magnolia Warbler going for a bug!

Magnolia Warbler

Magnolia Warbler

Magnolia Warbler

Magnolia Warbler

Magnolia Warbler

Magnolia Warbler

Black and White Warbler

Black and White Warbler

Black and White Warbler going for the bug.

Black and White Warbler going for the bug.

Black and White Warbler

Black and White Warbler

Black and White Warbler

Black and White Warbler

Black and White Warbler

Black and White Warbler

Yellow-rumped Warbler

Yellow-rumped Warbler

Yellow-rumped Warbler

Yellow-rumped Warbler

Yellow-rumped Warbler

Yellow-rumped Warbler

Yellow-rumped Warbler

Yellow-rumped Warbler

Yellow-rumped Warbler preening

Yellow-rumped Warbler preening

Yellow-rumped Warbler

Yellow-rumped Warbler

Yellow-rumped Warbler

Yellow-rumped Warbler

Prairie Warbler at the Linnwood Water Treatment Plant “Magic Hedge” in Milwaukee Wisconsin on April 15, 2015

I made the run into Milwaukee very early this morning with hopes to see the reported male Prairie Warbler. The Prairie Warbler was reported yesterday early morning and remained at this location for most of the day. This “Magic Hedge” is just south of the water treatment plant on Lake Michigan on Milwaukee’s lakefront. I arrived at the reported location at 6:20 am. Another birder Laurie was already on site looking for the Prairie Warbler but could not locate it. We both looked hard up and down the hedge for about 30 minutes and then I spotted the Prairie Warbler high in one of the 2 spruce trees to the north. Moments later a Kinglet was spotted in the same tree. Action stopped and we both left the area. I birded Lake Park for well over an hour and not much as going on. I ended my walk on the north end of the park on Memorial Drive with about 5 birders looking around that area for yesterdays report of the Screech Owl but the owl was no where to be seen. I thought I would walk over and check the “Magic Hedge” once more. In only a couple of minutes I spotted the Prairie Warbler up in the spruce where I had saw it earlier. They don’t call this hedge “Magic Hedge” for no reason. The Prairie Warbler flew out of the spruce tree into the hedge. It feed actively for about 5 minutes down east to the lake on the hedge. It looked for insects etc on the ground. It returned west on the hedge back and flew right back into the spruce tree. It remained there for the next 30 minutes and then I left the area. The “Magic Hedge” has produced some great birds over the years and should be check often. A big thank you to Andy Cassini for finding this great bird and getting the word out for others to come and try for it. Not a life bird for me as I found a Prairie Warbler a couple years ago up in Lake Park just up the hill from this location and another in the South Kettle Moraine in 2010. Images were taken on April 15, 2015.

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Prairie Warbler

Binomial name: Dendroica discolor

Category: Wood Warblers

Size: 4.75” long, 7” wing span

Weight: 0.27 Oz

Range: The normal range for this bird is the eastern US, west to portions of eastern Texas, Kansas and all of Missouri, south into Florida and north to northern IL but not Wisconsin. Every year a few are found in Wisconsin. Always a special event for birders to see one!

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Searching for it’s next insect!

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Neck feathers up, searching for it’s next insect!

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Neck feathers up!

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Neck feathers up!

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Searching for it’s next insect!

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Searching for it’s next insect!

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Neck feathers up!

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Neck feathers up, searching for it’s next insect!

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Neck feathers down, searching for it’s next insect!

Finding and insect to eat

Finding an insect to eat.

Searching for food on the ground at the east end of the hedge.

Searching for food on the ground at the east end of the hedge.

Searching for food on the ground at the east end of the hedge but thinking about getting back up into the hedge.

Searching for food on the ground at the east end of the hedge but thinking about getting back up into the hedge.

Take off!

Take off!

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Searching for it’s next insect!

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Searching for it’s next insect at take off!

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Going for it’s next insect!

Searching for the next insect.

Searching for the next insect.

Looking around

Looking around

Searching for the next insect.

Tail spread, doc shot.

Tail spread, doc shot

Tail spread, doc shot

American Redstart

American Redstarts have been present at the Fox River Sanctuary in Waukesha Wisconsin for the last couple of weeks. The American Redstart is a warbler species that some birders are not aware of. One of the most active warblers, it always amazes me how they fly so fast through the trees and brush in 2’s never hitting a thing! I have put together a few images of both the males and females. Images were taken May 13-18, 2014.

 

American Redstart - Male

American Redstart – Male

American Redstart

Binomial name: Setophaga ruticilla

Category: Wood-Warblers

Size: 5.25” long, 7.75” wingspan

Weight: 0.29 oz.

Habitat: Breeding habitat, deciduous, second growth woodlands with moisture. Habitat can include alder and willow thickets, shrubs, treefall areas situated with old growth forests. They will also use thickets in orchards in fencerows. Breeding range is eastern US, northern parts of the west, well into Canada, winters in parts of Central and South America.

Diet: Insects by flushing by fanning their tail and flashing their wings. They do this from the ground to near the top of the canopy catching insects off limbs, leaves and branches. In fall they may eat berries or fruit that are small.

Nesting: The male shows the female possible nest sites during early courtship and the female tests them out and finally settles on one. It is located on a main trunk of a tree or shrub in a camouflaged location. The female builds her own nest in 3-7 days. The nest is constructed of tightly woven bark strips, feathers, animal and milkweed hairs, lichens, twigs, pine needles, rootlets, leaves and sometimes wasp nest paper material. It is cup shaped 2”-3” wide, 2”-1.5” deep. Typically 2-5 eggs are laid and incubated for 10-13 days by the female.

American Redstart - Female

American Redstart – Female

American Redstart - Male

American Redstart – Male

American Redstart - Female

American Redstart – Female

American Redstart - Female

American Redstart – 1st year male, note black on front of breast.

American Redstart - Female, at takeoff!

American Redstart – Female, at takeoff!

American Redstart - Male

American Redstart – Male

American Redstart - Female

American Redstart – Female

American Redstart - Female

American Redstart – Female

American Redstart - Male

American Redstart – Male, calling!

American Redstart - Female

American Redstart – 1st year male, note black dots on front of breast.

American Redstart - Female

American Redstart – Female

Bay-breasted Warbler

Bay-breast Warblers at the Fox River Sanctuary in Waukesha Wisconsin. While birding here today it started out slow but by mid-morning warbler action had picked up with 10 warbler species were present. Numbers of each warbler species has dropped from a couple days ago. The Bay-breasted Warblers both male and female with their beautiful colors gave nice views for short periods of time. Other warbler species present were Palm, Yellow, American Redstart, Magnolia, Blackpoll, Blackburnian, Yellow-rumped, Wilson’s and Chestnut-sided.  With the very warm day today with temps at 85, the trees are filling out fast. Images taken on May 20, 2014.

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Bay-breasted Warbler – Male, calling!

Bay-breasted Warbler

Binomial name: Setophaga castanea

Category: Wood-Warblers

Size: 5.50” long, 9” wingspan

Weight: .44 oz.

Habitat: Coniferous forests

Diet: Insects and spiders

Nesting: The nest is usually made of twigs, bark and dry grasses placed on a horizontal limb on the bottom 1/3 of a dense spruce or fir tree. The natural lined cup shaped nest usually holds 4-7 eggs that are spotted or speckled and

Notes: One of the biggest warblers in size.

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Bay-breasted Warbler – Male

Bay-breasted Warbler - Male

Bay-breasted Warbler – Male

Bay-breast Warbler - Female

Bay-breast Warbler – Female

Bay-breasted Warbler - Female getting insect!

Bay-breasted Warbler – Female getting insect!

Bay-breasted Warbler - Female

Bay-breasted Warbler – Female

Bay-breasted Warbler - Male

Bay-breasted Warbler – Male

Bay-breasted Warbler - Male, looking up at insect!

Bay-breasted Warbler – Male, looking up at insect!

Bay-breasted Warbler - Male

Bay-breasted Warbler – Male, calling!

Bay-breasted Warbler - Male

Bay-breasted Warbler – Male, calling!

Bay-breasted Warbler - Male

Bay-breasted Warbler – Male

Bay-breasted Warbler - Male, going for the insect!

Bay-breasted Warbler – Male, going for the insect!

Bay-breasted Warbler - Male

Bay-breasted Warbler – Male

Philadelphia Vireo, Warbling Vireo, Prothonotary Warbler and more at the Fox River Sanctuary in Waukesha May 19, 2014.

I birded the Fox River Sanctuary in Waukesha Wisconsin mid-morning today. Two new species at the river today, the Philadelphia and Warbling Vireos. They gave nice views as they both continually foraged through the trees along the river. The warbler action started out a little slow but then picked up with a total of 12 warbler species. Some of the warbler highlights were a 30 second view of a Prothonotary, Blackburnian, Bay-breasted, Northern Parula and Wilson’s. This place just amazes me! Images were taken on May 19, 2014.

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Philadelphia Vireo

Philadelphia Vireo

Binomial name: Vireo phildelphicus

Category: Vireos

Size: 5.25” long, 8” wingspan

Weight: 0.42 oz.

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Philadelphia Vireo

Philadelphia Vireo

Philadelphia Vireo

Philadelphia Vireo - Looking up!

Philadelphia Vireo – Looking up!

Warbling Vireo

Warbling Vireo

Warbling Vireo

Warbling Vireo

Warbling Vireo

Warbling Vireo

Prothonotary Warbler

Prothonotary Warbler

Prothonotary Warbler

Prothonotary Warbler

Blackburnian Warbler - Male

Blackburnian Warbler – Male

Blackburnian Warbler - Male

Blackburnian Warbler – Male

Blackburnian Warbler - Male

Blackburnian Warbler – Male

Blackburnian Warbler - Male

Blackburnian Warbler – Male

Blackburnian Warbler - Male

Blackburnian Warbler – Male

Bay-breasted Warbler - Male

Bay-breasted Warbler – Male

Chestnut-sided Warbler - Female

Chestnut-sided Warbler – Female

Chestnut-sided Warbler - Female

Chestnut-sided Warbler – Female

Chestnut-sided Warbler - Female, going for an insect!

Chestnut-sided Warbler – Female, going for an insect!

Chestnut-sided Warbler

I did a short birding run today of  1 hour at the Fox River Sanctuary in Waukesha Wisconsin early this morning. The Chestnut-sided Warbler gave the best views of the 11 warbler species present. Lower numbers of each compared to a couple of days ago. The other warbler species present were Blackburnian, Palm, Northern Parula, Yellow-rumped, Yellow, Common Yellowthroat, Black-and-white, Magnolia, American Redstart and Wilson’s. It was a fun 1 hour with nice blue skies and mild temps of almost 50 at 8:00 am. Images are of males. Images were taken on May 18, 2014.

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Chestnut-sided Warbler

Binomial name: Setophaga pensyvanica

Category: Wood-Warblers

Size: 5” long, 7.75” wingspan

Weight: .34 oz.

Habitat: Open young second growth deciduous woodlands and woodland edges.

Diet: Insects and spiders, fruit and seeds occasionally

Nesting: The small cup shaped nest is usually located in the vertical fork of a shrub or vine tangle usually no higher than 2’ off the ground. The nest is of woven construction of weed and plant parts along with grasses and bark pieces. 3-5 cream colored with brown speckles are incubated for about 12 days.

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Warbler has a seed in the bill.

Warbler has a insect in the bill.

Warbler has just eaten the seed.

Warbler has just eaten the insect.

Warbler is going for the next insect.

Warbler is going for the next insect.

Warbler is grabbing the next insect off the branch.

Warbler is grabbing the next insect off the branch.

Warbler is eating that insect.

Warbler is eating that insect.

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Blackburnian Warbler

I stopped briefly at the Fox River Sanctuary in Waukesha Wisconsin late morning today. There was a nice selection of 9 warbler species present. The one that caught my eye was a male Blackburnian Warbler with the flaming-orange throat. The color of the throat was almost unbelievable. It was foraging in the grasses in the water for insects. At one time it came up onto a bridge and picked insects off the railing. It appears this little guy has a wood tick on the forehead. Other warbler species present were Palm, Northern Parula, Yellow-rumped, Yellow, Magnolia, American Redstart, Wilson’s and Chestnut-sided. It was a fun hour or so there as the warbler action continues. It was another cloudy day, temps in the 50’s, but a nice hour or so out birding. Images were taken on May 16, 2014.

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Blackburnian Warbler

Binomial name: Dendroica fusca

Category: Wood-Warblers

Size: 5” long, 8.5” wingspan

Weight: 0.34 oz.

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Going for the next insect!

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Got that insect!

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Insect on the end of the bill!

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Insect on the end of the bill!

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On the bridge!

On the bridge with cob webs all over the face picking off insects from underneath the bridge railing !

On the bridge looking for insects!

On the bridge looking for insects!

On the bridge!

Insect on bill end, on the bridge!

On the bridge!

On the bridge!

On the bridge!

Looking for the next insect on the bridge!

Yellow Warbler

The Yellow Warblers have been present along with many other species of warblers at the Fox River Sanctuary in Waukesha Wisconsin. They continually forage like the rest of them up and down the trees hanging over the water. Like the others too, they always are flying back and forth across the river there as their eyes pick up flying insects above the water. Other warbler species present were Blackburnian, Palm, Northern Parula, Blackpoll, Black-and-white, Yellow-rumped, Magnolia, American Redstart and Chestnut-sided. Images were taken on May 14, 2014. The images appear to be males, so I added some at the bottom (last 4) that should be females taken at Wehr Nature Center back in 2013 for identifying females.

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Yellow Warbler

Binomial name: Setophaga petechia

Category: Wood-Warblers

Size: 5” long, 8” wingspan

Weight: .33 oz.

Habitat: Moist thickets along streams, wetlands, ponds, and swampy areas. They also inhabit dry areas such as, orchards, farmlands, forest edges, berry patches and gardens.

Diet: Mostly insects they pick from foliage and capture in flight.

Nesting: Typically a nest is built about 10’ from the ground but sometimes higher. Nests are located in the vertical fork of a bush or trees such as willow, dogwood or honeysuckle. The nest is cup size build with materials such as grasses, bark strips, and nettle plant material. The nest is wrapped with spider webs, plant down and fiber material. The inside lining can consists of materials such as dandelion, willow, cattail seeds, feathers and deer hair. The female lays 4-5 eggs, incubation last 10 to 14 days. The nesting period can be from 8 to 12 days.

Notes: Look for Yellow Warblers near the tops of small trees and tall shrubs.

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Yellow Warbler - Male Wehr Nature Center May 13, 2013

Yellow Warbler – Female, little red streaking on breast if any, Wehr Nature Center May 13, 2013

Yellow Warbler - Male Wehr Nature Center May 13, 2013

Yellow Warbler – Female, little red streaking on breast if any, Wehr Nature Center May 13, 2013

Yellow Warbler - Male Wehr Nature Center May 13, 2013

Yellow Warbler – Female, little red streaking on breast if any, Wehr Nature Center May 13, 2013

Yellow Warbler - Female Wehr Nature Center May 13, 2013

Yellow Warbler – Female, little red streaking on breast if any, Wehr Nature Center May 13, 2013

Northern Parula

Northern Parulas at the Fox River Sanctuary in Waukesha Wisconsin. In the couple of hours I spent birding there, a couple of Northern Parulas showed and gave nice views as they were foraging through the trees on insects. Other warbler species present were Blackburnian, Palm, Yellow, Blackpoll, Black-and-white, Yellow-rumped, Magnolia, American Redstart and Chestnut-sided. It was a overcast day, dark day at times, 50’s, but still a nice day to be out viewing all the warbler action. It appears all the images are of males. Images taken on May 14, 2014.

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Northern Parula

Binomial name: Parula americana

Category: Wood-Warblers

Size: 4.5” long, 7” wingspan

Weight: 0.3 oz.

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