Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers at Lake Park in Milwaukee Wisconsin on April 10, 2017

Lake Park in Milwaukee had some Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers today. I probably saw a good half-dozen at the north end of the park. Like usual, if they have some good trees with sap running they return to those trees on and off. Sap looked great today with the warm weather, it was just oozing out. I don’t recall seeing any males, these were females. Last year there were nice numbers too at Lake Park, on April 8th, only two days off from last year. Images were taken on April 10, 2017.

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Yellow-bellied Sapsucker along with the sap running out of the tree

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker

Binomial name: Sphyrapicus varius

Category: Woodpeckers and Allies

Size: 8.5” long, 16” wing span

Weight: 1.8 oz

Getting that running sap...

Getting that running sap…

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Look at all that sap and holes in the tree, the sap is just oozing out...

Look at all that sap and holes in the tree, the sap is just oozing out…

Getting sap

Working a hole for some sap or future sap

Getting that sap

Getting that sap

Getting that sap...

Getting that sap…

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The tongue…

Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers at Lake Park in Milwaukee Wisconsin on April 8, 2016

I stopped at Lake Park late morning today to check things out. The highlight was numerous Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers licking sap from new and old holes in trees. Some would sit lower towards the base of the tree as there may be more sap at those locations. It was interesting to sit and watch as this continued while I was present. Snow fell for most of the time I was present, a gloomy day with some winds. Birds around where very active. A couple species to note where a Golden-crowned Kinglet and my first  Yellow-rumped Warbler of the year. Images where taken on April 8, 2016.

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Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, male

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker

Binomial name: Sphyrapicus varius

Category: Woodpeckers and Allies

Size: 8.5” long, 16” wing span

Weight: 1.8 oz

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Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, female getting sap

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Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, male getting sap

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Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, male

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Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, male

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Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, female getting sap

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Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, male with sap on bill

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Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, female

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Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, male

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Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, female

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Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, male getting sap

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Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, female

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Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, female getting sap

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Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, female

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Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, female getting sap

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Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, male working on getting sap

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Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, male

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, male

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, male

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Yellow-rumped Warbler

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Yellow-rumped Warbler

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Golden-crowned Kinglet

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Golden-crowned Kinglet

Lewis’s Woodpecker in Trempealeau County Wisconsin on November 24, 2015

I made the run up to Trempealeau County early am with hopes to see the reported Lewis’s Woodpecker. I left in darkness, arrived in darkness. After some light arrived, so did the woodpeckers. Downy, Hairy, Red-bellied Woodpeckers and then the beautiful male Lewis’s Woodpecker! This Lewis’s should be the 4th state record for Wisconsin if I am correct. Its normal range is Colorado and west, what an exciting bird to have show up in Wisconsin. They did not waste anytime, all the woodpeckers were active most of the time I was there. The Lewis’s pretty much stayed in about 1 acre of the front yard at the home. On 2 occasions it flew north and south what appeared to be long distances but returned. Dan B showed up after awhile and the Lewis’s gave nice views but remained higher in branched trees. Daryl showed up, the bird was active for a while but left the area for about 45 minutes and did not return, I headed for home. The bird only hit the suet feeder once while we were there, and it was a split second. We gave this bird plenty of space. One sometimes wonders how these birds are found. Amanda the mother told me that Isaiah the son found the bird, the daughter Zaila identified the bird immediately. Great find Isaiah, great ID Zaila! Zaila is a birder working on a life list etc, congrats to all of them. I hope I got this information correct. The bird was found this last Sunday. A big thank you to Amanda the mother, the outstanding host for all the birders who have showed up and to all the family for letting others come see this rare bird that is visiting in their yard. Thanks too, to everyone that has kept updates on this bird and excellent directions to the location. A life bird for me and a cool one at that. It was a very fun morning for all of us on a beautiful late November day! Hope the bird hangs around for others to see. Images were taken on November 24, 2015. UPDATE: To my understanding, the Lewis’s Woodpecker was still being seen as of Friday February 5, 2016.

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Lewis’s Woodpecker

Binomial name: Melanerpes lewis

Category: Woodpeckers and Allies

Size: 10.75” long, 21” wing span

Weight: 4 oz

Cool fact: Normal Range is Colorado west, far northern Mexico north to lower Canada

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Always looking for insects!

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Looking in all the loose bark openings for insects!

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Looking in all the loose bark openings for insects!

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Just resting

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Early morning sun

Early morning sun just sitting

Preening early morning sun

Scratching, early morning sun

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Early morning sun, just taking a break

Getting those inscets

Getting those insects!

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Getting those insects!

Getting those insects!

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Always looking for insects!

With possible acorn

With possible acorn

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In action

In action

In action

In action

In action

In action

In action

In action

In action, looking for insects

In action

In action, looking for insects

In action

In action, looking for insects

From the barn yard pole!

From the barnyard pole!

Red-headed Woodpeckers and other birds in Marquette County Wisconsin on November 7, 2015

I did some birding in Marquette County Wisconsin today. I always enjoy watching the Red-headed Woodpeckers working from sun up to sun down. They get acorns from live trees, break them up in pockets of dead trees and bury the pieces within dead trees or under bark of dead trees. They store these pieces for winter food no matter how deep the snow is, it will always be available. They always seem to store the pieces in trees near nest holes that will probably be used in spring for raising the young. I have a water hole I watch and two of the highlights today were a Brown Creeper and a Red-eyed Vireo. The Red-eyed Vireo is listed as a rare bird for this date in Marquette Co. This bird moved very fast in the couple of seconds I saw it, I just barely got a photo. I have never seen a bird drink like today. It flew across the pond, barely touched the water, opened its bill and grabbed a drink for a second and never slowing down, off it went like a bullet south. Other common birds gave nice shows which is always a treat. Images were taken on November 7, 2015.

Red-headed Woodpecker with a piece of acorn after splitting one up in the top of this dead oak tree.

Red-headed Woodpecker with a piece of acorn after splitting one up in the top of this dead oak tree, early morning sun

With acorn piece

With acorn piece

Hammering a piece of acorn into the hole of the dead tree for winter food

Hammering a piece of acorn into the hole of the dead tree for winter food

Hammering a piece of acorn into the hole of the dead tree for winter food

Hammering a piece of acorn into the hole of the dead tree for winter food

Hammering a piece of acorn into the hole of the dead tree for winter food

Putting a piece of acorn into the hole of the dead tree for winter food

Putting a piece of acorn into the hole of the dead tree for winter food

Putting a piece of acorn into the hole of the dead tree for winter food

Putting a piece of acorn into the hole of the dead tree for winter food

Just looking around after storing some winter food

Putting a piece of acorn into a crack of the dead tree for winter food

Putting a piece of acorn into a crack of the dead tree for winter food

Putting a piece of acorn into the hole of the dead tree for winter food

Going to put a piece of acorn into a crack of the dead tree for winter food

Splitting up an acorn in the pocket in the dead oak

Splitting up an acorn in the pocket in the dead oak

Splitting up an acorn in the pocket in the dead oak

Splitting up an acorn in the pocket in the dead oak

Don't need this shell of the acorn, out it goes!

Don’t need this shell of the acorn, out it goes!

With a new piece of acorn to go store it for the winter

With a new piece of acorn to go store it for the winter

Red-eyed Vireo, a RARE bird for this date in Marquette Co. WI. 11/7/15

Red-eyed Vireo, a RARE bird for this date in Marquette Co. WI. 11/7/15

Red-eyed Vireo, a RARE bird for this date in Marquette Co. WI. 11/7/15

Red-eyed Vireo, a RARE bird for this date in Marquette Co. WI. 11/7/15

Brown Creeper

Brown Creeper

Brown Creeper

Brown Creeper

Brown Creeper

Brown Creeper

Dark-eyed Junco ready for a bath

Dark-eyed Junco

Dark-eyed Junco bathing

Dark-eyed Junco bathing

Blue Jay calling

Blue Jay calling

Blue Jay

Blue Jay

Blue Jay calling

Blue Jay calling

Black-capped Chickadee bathing

Black-capped Chickadee bathing

Black-capped Chickadee just out of the water

Black-capped Chickadee just out of the water

Dark-eyed Junco

Dark-eyed Junco

Dark-eyed Junco

Dark-eyed Junco

Blue Jay on alert!

Blue Jay on alert!

Blue Jay looking back

Blue Jay looking back

Blue Jay posing

Blue Jay posing

 

Birding in the South Kettle Moraine State Forest in Waukesha County Wisconsin on January 19, 2015

I did a little birding in the South Kettle Moraine State Forest in Waukesha County and came across a bird feeder with some common winter birds. A few of the species that showed were Black-capped Chickadees, Red-bellied Woodpeckers, Downy Woodpeckers, White-breasted Nut-hatches and American Goldfinches. These birds gave a little spark to an otherwise slow day. Images were taken on January 19, 2015.

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Red-bellied Woodpecker

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Red-bellied Woodpecker

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Red-bellied Woodpecker

White-breasted Nuthatch

White-breasted Nuthatch

White-breasted Nuthatch

White-breasted Nuthatch

White-breasted Nuthatch

White-breasted Nuthatch

Downy Woodpecker

Downy Woodpecker

Downy Woodpecker hiding the seed

Downy Woodpecker hiding the seed

Black-capped Chickadee

Black-capped Chickadee

American Goldfinch

American Goldfinch

American Three-toed Woodpecker in Burnett County Wisconsin on December 10, 2014

The American Three-toed Woodpecker that had been reported in Burnett County was found at the location that was reported. A very rare bird for the state of Wisconsin, and what I read is viewed by few people because the location of it’s habitat. Chris W, Daryl C and I made the trip up leaving very early Wednesday morning getting there shortly after light. Deb P met up with us there and joined the group. It was a gloomy morning with low winds, just a few inches of snow on the ground with temps mild in the low 20’s, and balmy. This bird came into the area reported a few times for nice viewing. When the bird came into viewing, it worked different trees continually pecking non stop, at the tree it landed on. It moved to a few different trees on occasion continually pecking and as I remember not even stopping to look in the direction we were. With the continued action of the feeding bird, higher more than low in the heavily twigged trees, just to get a couple of photos was a challenge. After the short time of viewing the American Three-toed Woodpecker, we traveled north and east of that area looking for boreal species in boreal habitats for the rest of the day. What a beautiful part of the state! A couple of the highlights were 2 adult American Bald Eagles working a deer carcass  near a roadside and a flock of 300 plus Pine Siskins. We saw many flocks of Common Redpolls too working the roadsides high and low for seeds. No Hoary Redpolls to be found. Many thanks to Jim H, a local birder for finding this exciting bird and getting the report out for others to enjoy. I have also just now received information in a email of a person that knows someone that had viewed this species 2 miles from where it is currently being seen in 2013. I am waiting to hear back from the contact person on any other information on this event.  When you see a report like Jim’s, one always has to wonder how many rare birds could be out there that are missed. A life bird for me and a state life bird for the others! It was just a full day of excitement getting out and spending the day birding with some great birders and friends. I did take a couple so-so images to share, you just have to take what you can get with conditions given. Images were taken on December 10, 2014.

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American Three-toed Woodpecker

Binomial name: Picoides dorsalis

Category: Woodpeckers and Allies

Size: 8.75″ long, 15” wingspan

Weight: 2.3 oz

Habitat: They prefer boreal forests with mature or old growth larch, pine, fir and spruce. They can also be found in areas flooded, logged or burned with dead trees that have large infestations of boring beetles or insect outbreak.

Diet: Bark beetles larvae and boring beetles. Other insects are also eaten along with various fruits.

Nesting: A nest cavity is excavated by both adults in a dead tree or limb. Both adults incubate the eggs for an average of 13 days and young part from the nest on an average of 24 days.

Cool fact: A bird that is not seen by most people because of boreal habitat it typically lives in.

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American Three-toed Woodpecker working the tree, distant doc shot

American Three-toed Woodpecker working the tree, distant doc shot

American Three-toed Woodpecker working the tree, distant doc shot

American Three-toed Woodpecker working the tree, distant doc shot

American Three-toed Woodpecker working the tree, distant doc shot

American Three-toed Woodpecker working the tree, distant doc shot

American Three-toed Woodpecker doc shot

American Three-toed Woodpecker doc shot

American Three-toed Woodpecker flaking in the bark, doc shot

American Three-toed Woodpecker flaking in the bark, doc shot

American Bald Eagles in in a tree taking a break from trips to the deer carcass they are feeding on.

American Bald Eagles in in a tree taking a break from trips to the deer carcass they are feeding on.

Pine Siskin feeding on Alder seeds.

Pine Siskin feeding on Alder seeds.

Common Redpolls on the back roads in Burnett County

Common Redpolls on the back roads in Burnett County

Downy Woodpecker

I stopped for a short time today at the Fox River Sanctuary in Waukesha Wisconsin to do some birding. I watched a pair of Downy Woodpeckers excavating a nest hole in a dead tree. First I observed the male working at the nest hole and then the female took over for a while. They really put some time into doing this between breaks. Yellow-rumped Warblers were in large numbers late morning, but then that slowed early afternoon. A couple of Palm Warblers made a brief appearance and a handful of Cedar Waxwings hung around feeding on a few berries that made it through the winter.  Images were taken on April 23, 2014.

Pair of Downy Woodpeckers - the male (r), female (l) looking at the nest hole.

Pair of Downy Woodpeckers – the male (r), female (l) looking at the nest hole.

Downy Woodpecker

Binomial name: Picoides pubescens

Category: Woodpeckers and Allies

Size: 6.75” long, 12” wing span

Weight: 0.95 oz.

Habitat:  Breeds in open woodlands, parks, backyards, vacant lots, orchards mostly in deciduous trees. Their breeding range is from Alaska east through central Canada and all of the US except the Southwest.

Diet: Insects are their main diet, but they also eat berries and seeds. They are a frequent visitor to backyard bird feeders for suet and black sunflower seeds. The Downy has also been seen drinking from hummingbird feeders.

Nesting:  Both adults share the work of excavating a nest hole in a dead tree or limb. It takes the pair 1-3 weeks and the cavity is 6”-12” deep and is usually 1.5” or less across at the bottom. The bottom is lined with only wood chips where usually 3-8 eggs are laid.

Cool Facts: The Downy Woodpecker is typically a permanent resident to an area. They look very much like a Hairy Woodpecker but smaller and their bill is short and stubby where the Hairy bill is long. Adult males have a red patch on the back of their head. Woodpeckers do not sing, they just drum on wood to get the same effect. People think their drumming has to do with food, but they are actually very quiet eaters. The Downy is the most common woodpecker in backyards in North America. These woodpeckers and can peck up to 1200 times per minute while excavating a tree nest hole.

Downy Woodpecker working on the excavation.

Downy Woodpecker – female, working on the excavation.

Downy Woodpecker - male, working on the excavation.

Downy Woodpecker – male, working on the excavation.

Downy Woodpecker - working on the excavation.

Downy Woodpecker – male, working on the excavation.

Downy Woodpecker - male, working on the excavation.

Downy Woodpecker – male, working on the excavation.

 

Downy Woodpecker - just checking out another hole.

Downy Woodpecker – female, just checking out another hole.

Downy Woodpecker - female, just checking out another hole.

Downy Woodpecker – female, just checking out another hole.

Downy Woodpecker - female

Downy Woodpecker – female

Red-headed Woodpecker Adult and Juveniles Storing Acorns

Juvenile Red-headed Woodpecker with acorn

A Red-headed Woodpecker adult and juveniles storing acorns for the winter in Marquette County, WI.  Photographs taken November 19, 2013.

Juvenile Red-headed Woodpecker with acorn

Juvenile Red-headed Woodpecker with acorn

Juvenile Red-headed Woodpecker with acorn

Juvenile Red-headed Woodpecker with acorn

Juvenile Red-headed Woodpecker with acorn

Juvenile Red-headed Woodpecker with acorn

Adult Red-headed Woodpecker pulling acorn from tree top

Adult Red-headed Woodpecker pulling acorn from tree top

Adult Red-headed Woodpecker after removing acorn cap by striking it

Adult Red-headed Woodpecker after removing acorn cap by striking it

Adult Red-headed Woodpecker after dodging acorn cap

Adult Red-headed Woodpecker after dodging acorn cap

Adult Red-headed Woodpecker with acorn

Adult Red-headed Woodpecker with acorn

Adult Red-headed Woodpecker with acorn piece

Adult Red-headed Woodpecker with acorn piece

Adult Red-headed Woodpecker with acorn piece

Adult Red-headed Woodpecker with acorn piece

Juvenile Red-headed Woodpecker just after storing an acorn piece in tree cavity

Juvenile Red-headed Woodpecker just after storing an acorn piece in tree cavity

To see the gallery of images, please click here.

Birdwatching in Marquette County

While birdwatching in Marquette County, I was able to photograph Eastern Bluebirds, a Red-headed Woodpecker, and others on October 26, 2013. Images were taken near a small water source where birds were coming and going, bathing, preening and drinking.

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Eastern Bluebird

 

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Eastern Bluebird

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Red-headed Woodpecker, Juvenile transitioning to the red head

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Blue Jay

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Blue Jay

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Dark-eyed Junco

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Blue Jay

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Black-capped Chickadee

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Eastern Bluebird

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Eastern Bluebird

To see the gallery of images, please click here.

Red-headed Woodpecker Storing Acorns

A Red-headed Woodpecker storing acorns for the winter in Marquette County, WI.  Photographs taken October 13, 2013.

Red-Headed Woodpecker

Red-Headed Woodpecker

Red-headed Woodpecker

Binomial name: Melanerpes erythrocephalus

Category: Woodpeckers and Allies

Description: Red head with black back and white underparts.  The wings are black with white wingtips.  Adult males and females have identical plumage (sexually monomorphic).

Size: 7.5″- 9.8″ long, 16.7” wingspan

Weight: 2.0 oz. – 3.4 oz.

Habitat: Deciduous and coniferous forests, orchards, swamps, wetlands, and farmland

Diet: Insects, fruits, berries, nuts, and seeds

Nesting: Nests are built by both partners in cavities of dead trees or utility poles.  The males do most of the cavity excavation.  Females lay 3 to 10 eggs at one time, up to two broods per season.  The first brood is laid in May and incubated for 2 weeks, and hatchlings remain in the nest for 24 to 31 days.  Red-headed Woodpeckers often reuse the same nesting cavity year after year.

Notes: The Red-headed Woodpecker stores food, only one of four species in North American known to do so.  It may hide nuts, seeds, and insects.  In fact, Red-headed Woodpeckers awesome store grasshoppers still alive, stuck in tight crevices or covered with bark.  The Red-headed Woodpecker was also featured on a stamp from the United States Postal Service in 1996 and from 1999 – 2006.

Red-Headed Woodpecker with acorn piece to hide under bark

Red-Headed Woodpecker with acorn piece to hide under bark

Red-headed Woodpecker just finished breaking apart the acorn with its bill in tree limb packet

Red-headed Woodpecker just finished breaking apart the acorn with its bill in tree limb pocket

Red-headed Woodpecker just finished breaking apart the acorn with its bill in tree limb packet

Red-headed Woodpecker just finished breaking apart the acorn with its bill in tree limb pocket

Red-headed Woodpecker takes flight to a nearby tree limb to hide the acorn piece behind bark

Red-headed Woodpecker takes flight to a nearby tree limb to hide the acorn piece behind bark

Red-headed Woodpecker takes flight to a nearby tree limb to hide the acorn piece behind bark

Red-headed Woodpecker takes flight to a nearby tree limb to hide the acorn piece behind bark

Dead oak where Red-headed Woodpecker was photographed

Dead oak where Red-headed Woodpecker was photographed

Red-headed Woodpecker hiding acorn piece

Red-headed Woodpecker hiding acorn piece

Red-headed Woodpecker hiding acorn piece

Red-headed Woodpecker hiding acorn piece

Red-headed Woodpecker takes flight to a nearby tree limb to hide the acorn piece behind bark

Red-headed Woodpecker takes flight to a nearby tree limb to hide the acorn piece behind bark

For the gallery of images, please click here.

Red-headed Woodpeckers nesting and raising young in the South Kettle Moraine near Eagle Wisconsin May 2012

I came across a pair of Red-headed Woodpeckers in the South Kettle Moraine near Eagle Wisconsin. It appeared they were setting their sights on a dead oak tree, a place to raise young this year. I watched this pair for almost 2 months and almost daily. I started observing them when they started cleaning out an existing hole in a dead tree. They were getting it ready for the egg laying. As days went by they started bring food to the young. As the young got older they became visible in the hole opening. One thing I’ve noticed photographing these birds was that they took the food into the nest early on. As they chicks got bigger, as they brought the food to the young, they started making the young come closer to the hole opening for it. At the end just before the young left the nest hole, they made the young almost come out of the hole for the food. I noticed too that the adults both feed the young. The adults brought in all different types of food weather it was grasshoppers, daddy long legs, berries, larvae or what ever. That way when the young  finally left the nest, they knew exactly what their diet should consist of. It was a truly amazing experience to see this all happen over a period of almost 2 months. I was there the day the young birds finally left the nest hole. I captured one flight out of the hole. Off the birds went and after that day, a big storm came through. Not sure whatever happened to the young birds that fledged the nest as I never saw them again. I did see adults after that day, maybe the adults took them off to a place on their own, not sure. Images were taken over a period from the beginning of May 2012 into the beginning of July.

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Red-headed Woodpecker

Binomial name: Melanerpes erythrocephalus

Category: Woodpeckers and Allies

Description: Red head with black back and white underparts.  The wings are black with white wingtips.  Adult males and females have identical plumage (sexually monomorphic).

Size: 7.5″- 9.8″ long, 16.7” wingspan

Weight: 2.0 oz. – 3.4 oz.

Habitat: Deciduous and coniferous forests, orchards, swamps, wetlands, and farmland

Diet: Insects, fruits, berries, nuts, and seeds

Nesting: Nests are built by both partners in cavities of dead trees or utility poles.  The males do most of the cavity excavation.  Females lay 3 to 10 eggs at one time, up to two broods per season.  The first brood is laid in May and incubated for 2 weeks, and hatchlings remain in the nest for 24 to 31 days.  Red-headed Woodpeckers often reuse the same nesting cavity year after year.

Notes: The Red-headed Woodpecker stores food, only one of four species in North American known to do so.  It may hide nuts, seeds, and insects.  In fact, Red-headed Woodpeckers awesome store grasshoppers still alive, stuck in tight crevices or covered with bark.  The Red-headed Woodpecker was also featured on a stamp from the United States Postal Service in 1996 and from 1999 – 2006.

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An adult doing some work on the nest hole

An adult doing some work on the nest hole

An adult doing some work on the nest hole

An adult doing some work on the nest hole

An adult doing some work on the nest hole

An adult doing some work on the nest hole

An adult doing some work on the nest hole

An adult doing some work on the nest hole

An adult doing some work on the nest hole

An adult doing some work on the nest hole

An adult doing some work on the nest hole

An adult doing some work on the nest hole

An adult doing some work on the nest hole

An adult doing some work on the nest hole

An adult doing some work on the nest hole

Both adults doing some work on the nest hole

Both adults doing some work on the nest hole

On going adults bring food to the young, different types of food, insects, berries, etc.

On going adults bring food to the young, different types of food, insects, berries, etc.

On going adults bring food to the young, different types of food, insects, berries, etc.

On going adults bring food to the young, different types of food, insects, berries, etc.

On going adults bring food to the young, different types of food, insects, berries, etc.

On going adults bring food to the young, different types of food, insects, berries, etc.

On going adults bring food to the young, different types of food, insects, berries, etc.

On going adults bring food to the young, different types of food, insects, berries, etc.

Cleaning out the nest box

Cleaning out the nest box

An adult on a near by tree bringing food to the young

An adult on a near by tree bringing food to the young

An adult leaving the nest hole, the other adult ready to bring more in

An adult leaving the nest hole, the other adult just close by

On going adults bring food to the young, different types of food, insects, berries, etc.

On going adults bring food to the young, different types of food, insects, berries, etc.

An adult to leave the nest hole while the other adult is ready to bring in the next food for the young

An adult to leave the nest hole while the other adult is ready to bring in the next food for the young

An adult leaving the nest hole after feeding the young

An adult leaving the nest hole after feeding the young

On going adults bring food to the young, different types of food, insects, berries, etc.

On going adults bring food to the young, different types of food, insects, berries, etc.

An adult leaving the nest hole after feeding the young

An adult leaving the nest hole after feeding the young

On going adults bring food to the young, different types of food, insects, berries, etc.

On going adults bring food to the young, different types of food, insects, berries, etc.

An adult leaving the nest hole after feeding the young

An adult leaving the nest hole after feeding the young

An adult leaving the nest hole after feeding the young

An adult leaving the nest hole after feeding the young

An adult storing some food on a nearby tree

An adult storing some food on a nearby tree

An adult storing some food on a nearby tree

An adult storing some food on a nearby tree

An adult feeding the young

An adult feeding the young

An adult leaving the nest hole after feeding the young

An adult leaving the nest hole after feeding the young

On going adults bring food to the young, different types of food, insects, berries, etc.

On going adults bring food to the young, different types of food, insects, berries, etc.

On going adults bring food to the young, different types of food, insects, berries, etc.

On going adults bring food to the young, different types of food, insects, berries, etc.

On going adults bring food to the young, different types of food, insects, berries, etc.

On going adults bring food to the young, different types of food, insects, berries, etc.

 An adult leaving the nest hole after feeding the young

An adult leaving the nest hole after feeding the young

An adult just before leaving the nest after bringing food to the young

An adult just before leaving the nest after bringing food to the young

An adult just before landing at the nest hole with food for the young

An adult just before landing at the nest hole with food for the young

On going adults bring food to the young, different types of food, insects, berries, etc.

On going adults bring food to the young, different types of food, insects, berries, etc.

An adult just before landing at the nest hole with food for the young

An adult just before landing at the nest hole with food for the young

On going adults bring food to the young, different types of food, insects, berries, etc.

On going adults bring food to the young, different types of food, insects, berries, etc.

On going adults bring food to the young, different types of food, insects, berries, etc.

On going adults bring food to the young, different types of food, insects, berries, etc.

An adult just before landing at the nest hole with food for the young

An adult just before landing at the nest hole with food for the young

An adult off in a distance from the nest. This happens sometimes as they prepare the food before bringing it into the nest hole to eat. It may be compacted some what of whatever the bird does at this time in preparation

An adult off in a distance from the nest. This happens sometimes as they prepare the food before bringing it into the nest hole to eat. It may be compacted some what of whatever the bird does at this time in preparation

A young Red-headed Woodpecker sticks its head out of the nest hole waiting for an adult to bring in food

A young Red-headed Woodpecker sticks its head out of the nest hole waiting for an adult to bring in the next food

Adult bringing food to the young. As I noted, the adults draw the young closer to the nest hole opening till they are just about out of the hole to get the food

Adult bringing food to the young. As I noted, the adults draw the young closer to the nest hole opening till they are just about out of the hole to get the food

Adult bringing food to the young. As I noted, the adults draw the young closer to the nest hole opening till they are just about out of the hole to get the food

Adult bringing food to the young. As I noted, the adults draw the young closer to the nest hole opening till they are just about out of the hole to get the food

Adult bringing food to the young. As I noted, the adults draw the young closer to the nest hole opening till they are just about out of the hole to get the food

Adult bringing food to the young. As I noted, the adults draw the young closer to the nest hole opening till they are just about out of the hole to get the food

Adult bringing food to the young. As I noted, the adults draw the young closer to the nest hole opening till they are just about out of the hole to get the food

Adult bringing food to the young. As I noted, the adults draw the young closer to the nest hole opening till they are just about out of the hole to get the food

Adult bringing food to the young. As I noted, the adults draw the young closer to the nest hole opening till they are just about out of the hole to get the food

Adult bringing food to the young. As I noted, the adults draw the young closer to the nest hole opening till they are just about out of the hole to get the food

Adult bringing food to the young. As I noted, the adults draw the young closer to the nest hole opening till they are just about out of the hole to get the food

Adult bringing food to the young. As I noted, the adults draw the young closer to the nest hole opening till they are just about out of the hole to get the food

Adult bringing food to the young. As I noted, the adults draw the young closer to the nest hole opening till they are just about out of the hole to get the food

Adult bringing food to the young. As I noted, the adults draw the young closer to the nest hole opening till they are just about out of the hole to get the food

Adult bringing food to the young. As I noted, the adults draw the young closer to the nest hole opening till they are just about out of the hole to get the food

Adult bringing food to the young. As I noted, the adults draw the young closer to the nest hole opening till they are just about out of the hole to get the food

Adult bringing food to the young. As I noted, the adults draw the young closer to the nest hole opening till they are just about out of the hole to get the food

Adult bringing food to the young. As I noted, the adults draw the young closer to the nest hole opening till they are just about out of the hole to get the food. This bird is showing some for the red on the back of the head already

a young Red-headed Woodpecker with a berry in its bill

a young Red-headed Woodpecker with a berry in its bill

A young Red-headed Woodpecker sticks its head out of the nest hole waiting for an adult to bring in the next food

A young Red-headed Woodpecker sticks its head out of the nest hole waiting for an adult to bring in the next food

The maiden flight for this young Red-headed Woodpecker leaving the nest. It was one of 2 birds that left the nest that day

The maiden flight for this young Red-headed Woodpecker leaving the nest. It was one of 2 birds that left the nest that day

Young Red-headed Woodpecker off in a distance in some near by oaks after it left the nest. Already eating something here

Young Red-headed Woodpecker off in a distance in some near by oaks after it left the nest. Already eating something here