Red Fox in Milwaukee County Wisconsin on July 30, 2015

While birding the lakefront in Milwaukee this morning I came across a Red Fox. This is a kit from this spring and growing fast, getting closer to looking like an adult. It did some hunting in tall grass areas while I was present and it appeared it found some food. Cool to see a Red Fox out midday as I think they are seen less during the day, more very early morning and late evening, just my opinion.

_rIMG_7175_cr

Red Fox

Scientific name: Vulpes vulpes

Type: Mammal

Habitat: Forests, grasslands, mountains, savanna, agricultural lands and deserts. Red Foxes can also adapt to farms, suburban areas and sometimes cities.

Average life span in the wild: 2 to 4 years

Size: Head and body, 18-33.75 inches

Weight: 6.5 to 24 lbs

Diet: Fruit, vegetables, fish, frogs, rabbits, birds and rodents in the wild. If living in a human environment they may include in the diet garbage and pet food.

Range: Northern hemisphere from the arctic circle to Central American. They can also be found in Northern Africa and central Asia.

_rIMG_7068_cr

_rIMG_7052_cr

_rIMG_7033_cr

_rIMG_7149_cr

_rIMG_7081_cr

_rrIMG_7175_cr

_rIMG_7227_cr

_rIMG_7238_cr

Tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

About admin

Window to Wildlife features the photography of Jim Edlhuber. A lifelong native of Wisconsin, Jim has been photographing wildlife for 20 years. He considers himself an avid photographer and is always trying to capture nature and wildlife through his lens. He is in several photography clubs and has won numerous awards for his work. In recent years, Jim has focused mostly on birding photography and finds it to be the most challenging.

One Response to Red Fox in Milwaukee County Wisconsin on July 30, 2015

  1. Mary Lee Agnew says:

    Wonderful photos Jim. I have been observing this family of foxes for many years. The fox in your photos is a female kit born this past March. While it is not common to see an adult fox during day time hours it is common to see the kits. This kit is also suffering early stages mange.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.