Red Knot at Racine North Beach in Racine County Wisconsin on September 11, 2018

I arrived at North Beach in Racine at sunrise with hopes to see the Red Knot that was reported yesterday. After 45 minutes of walking the entire beach from the north to the south, I found this juvenile bird right near the pier on the south end. After only a moment of watching it through my bins, the beach cleaning machine flushed the bird far to the north. It remained there for awhile feeding and going through mussels, etc finding things to eat. I took a few images of this rare visitor and it was present when I walked away. Thanks to Rick Fare for finding this 2nd Red Knot as another one was had just been reported in the same location on September 8th. Thanks for getting the word out to for others to see it. Not a life bird as I got one back on August 16th 2014 in Hustisford. It was a beautiful morning with full sun, a light breeze, mild temps. Images were taken on September 11, 2018.

Red Knot, a juvenile bird…

Red Knot

Binomial name: Calidris canutus

Category: Sandpipers, Phalaropes, and Allies

Size: 10.5” long, 23” wing span

Weight: 4.7 Oz.

Note: A rare  visitor as the normal range for this species is breeding on the Canadian coasts and wintering on the southern east and west coasts of the United States.

Picking through the mussels and finding food in them…

Food in the bill…

More food in the bill…

Something in the bill…

Going to eat it…

Gets something out of a mussel…

Sanderling , left – Red Knot, right

Blurry flight shot, but look at the amazing feather patterns…

Walking along the beach checking out mussels, looking for something to eat…

More things to eat…

More…

Hunting for food…

Looking pretty…

Moving up and down the beach…

Tossing a mussel around……………and it gets something, it is on the tip of the bill….

Going inside the mussel for something to eat…

Red Knot Hustisford Wisconsin August 16, 2014

This rare visitor to the state, the Red Knot was eating well when I left the river last night just before dark. I decided to make another run up there to Hustisford early morning to get a couple more images in day light. I did not see it when I arrived but Dave S. found it as he arrived a few minutes after I and he had his scope. This bird blends in very well with the habitat there. In fact a few times during my visit along with a couple other birders we lost sight of it and it was right in front of us but behind some thin vegetation. Like yesterday, this bird actively feed the whole time I was there other than it preened once. Nice to see this rare bird once more. Images were taken in Hustisford Wisconsin on the Rock River in Dodge Co. August 16, 2014.

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Red Knot

Binomial name: Calidris canutus

Category: Sandpipers, Phalaropes, and Allies

Size: 10.5” long, 23” wing span

Weight: 4.7 Oz.

Habitat: Breeding habitat in tundra areas that are drier and hillsides with sparse vegetation. Outside of breeding habitat they are found near coastal inlets, large tidal mudflats, rocky shores and beaches, bays and estuaries.

Diet: Breeding season it eats sedge seeds and shoots from horsetail and grasses. In snow free areas it will include some invertebrates in their diet. They eat marine worms, grasshoppers, horseshoe crab eggs and other invertebrates in their winter range.

Nesting: Their nest is a depression on the ground lined with lichens, grasses and leaves. It is cup shaped and constructed by the male. 3 to 5 of these are male prior to the arrival of the female, she lays 3-4 eggs and they are incubated around 22 days by both parents. Chicks are hatched in downy cryptic feathers. With a day or so the chicks leave the nest and area and they begin foraging with both adults.

Cool facts: One of the most colorful peeps and the largest in North America. There was a time when the Red Knot was the most numerous shorebird in North America. It migration can be one of the longest being up to 10,000 miles one way. The young chicks make their first long journey on their own.

Red Knot with a Pectoral Sandpiper

Red Knot with a Semipalmated Sandpiper

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Red Knot with a Pectoral Sandpiper

Red Knot

Red Knot

Red Knot

Red Knot

Red Knot with a Lesser Yellowlegs

Red Knot with a Lesser Yellowlegs

Red Knot with a Pectoral Sandpiper

Red Knot with a Least Sandpiper

Red Knot feeding

Red Knot feeding

Red Knot feeding

Red Knot feeding

Red Knot feeding

Red Knot feeding

Red Knot

Red Knot

Red Knot

Red Knot

Fluffed up Red Knot

Fluffed up Red Knot

Red Knot feeding

Red Knot feeding

Red Knot Hustisford Wisconsin August 15, 2014

After seeing a post this evening of a rare visitor to Wisconsin a Red Knot in Hustisford I made the trip up there just before dark, about 7:00 PM. The bird was present as reported below the wires over the river below the dam. A new life bird for me. Thanks to Tom W. for finding this bird along with the presence of Dave S. Images were taken in Dodge County Wisconsin on August 15, 2014.

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Red Knot

Binomial name: Calidris canutus

Category: Sandpipers, Phalaropes, and Allies

Size: 10.5” long, 23” wing span

Weight: 4.7 Oz.

Habitat: Breeding habitat in tundra areas that are drier and hillsides with sparse vegetation. Outside of breeding habitat they are found near coastal inlets, large tidal mudflats, rocky shores and beaches, bays and estuaries.

Diet: Breeding season it eats sedge seeds and shoots from horsetail and grasses. In snow free areas it will include some invertebrates in their diet. They eat marine worms, grasshoppers, horseshoe crab eggs and other invertebrates in their winter range.

Nesting: Their nest is a depression on the ground lined with lichens, grasses and leaves. It is cup shaped and constructed by the male. 3 to 5 of these are male prior to the arrival of the female, she lays 3-4 eggs and they are incubated around 22 days by both parents. Chicks are hatched in downy cryptic feathers. With a day or so the chicks leave the nest and area and they begin foraging with both adults.

Cool facts: One of the most colorful peeps and the largest in North America. There was a time when the Red Knot was the most numerous shorebird in North America. It migration can be one of the longest being up to 10,000 miles one way. The young chicks make their first long journey on their own.

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