Western Kingbird at Warnimont Park in Cudahy Wisconsin on November 3, 2015

I headed to Warnimont Park early this morning in hopes to see the recently reported Western  Kingbird. The bird is a uncommon visitor to the state. I arrived just after sunrise and David F was doing some looking around for the bird. Judith and Rita arrived shortly there after. We all looked the bluff over well and parts of the golf course too. After about 30 minutes I spotted the Western Kingbird coming from the bluff off the east end of the parking lot. It landed on the top of a large deciduous tree just south of the parking lot. From there the bird continually forged on the bluff edge and the golf course. The bird appeared to find many insects to eat with the warm weather. It gave nice views to many birders that came and went in the couple hours I was present. At one point the bird regurgitated some berries which was interesting. The bird mostly hung around the area from the old gun club building to the parking lot on the north end of the golf course. This bird is said to be a different Western Kingbird than the one that most of us saw at the Milwaukee Community Garden in mid October. Thanks to Bill M for finding this uncommon bird for the area getting the word out for others to see. Thanks to Jen too for her great post and to other who gave updates on this bird yesterday. A fun morning out with some great birding friends. Images were taken on November 3, 2015.

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Western Kingbird

Binomial name: Tyrannus verticalis

Category: Tyrant Flycatchers

Size: 8.75” long, 15.5” wing span

Weight: 1.4 Oz

Natural range: The natural breeding range for this species is western Minnesota west almost to the Pacific Ocean, southern Texas north to lower Canada. Winters in Mexico and south.

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Blurry back shot

Blurry back shot

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About admin

Window to Wildlife features the photography of Jim Edlhuber. A lifelong native of Wisconsin, Jim has been photographing wildlife for 20 years. He considers himself an avid photographer and is always trying to capture nature and wildlife through his lens. He is in several photography clubs and has won numerous awards for his work. In recent years, Jim has focused mostly on birding photography and finds it to be the most challenging.

7 Responses to Western Kingbird at Warnimont Park in Cudahy Wisconsin on November 3, 2015

  1. Nan Wisherd says:

    Really great shots, Jim! Thanks for sharing.

  2. Darrell Schiffman says:

    As usual nice pictures Jim. I am sorry I missed you today, but I spent the morning searching for the Scissor tailed Flycatcher with very little success. It was seen by another birder for a very quick glimpse and not seem again as far as I know. Met up with Marty Everson later in the morning and we found the Kingbird at the edge of the parking lot as we drove up. Continue posting the pictures for everyone to enjoy.

  3. Annie says:

    Awesome pics. What In the world did the bird up chuck ? Maybe I should know……..but……

  4. Ed Means says:

    Nice pics. Guess he didn’t like the berries as much as the insects. Interesting photos of the berry upchuck. Thanks for posting

  5. Annie says:

    Oh dear, if I’d only read before going to your ever so clear pictures first, I would have been informed of the up chucked berries. Try that again!!

  6. Janet Vinje says:

    thank you and all the other birders/photographers! Many of these posts are so sharp and with enough information that I am able to learn a great deal and be thrilled with the beauty at the same time. I have become quite enthralled with birds in general. You have added to both my interest, knowledge and wonderment!

  7. Laura says:

    I love to see the many, interesting birds you photograph. I especially like the unusual perspective of the last one, I never even noticed it was blurry until you captioned it that way.

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