Chestnut-sided Warbler

I did a short birding run today of  1 hour at the Fox River Sanctuary in Waukesha Wisconsin early this morning. The Chestnut-sided Warbler gave the best views of the 11 warbler species present. Lower numbers of each compared to a couple of days ago. The other warbler species present were Blackburnian, Palm, Northern Parula, Yellow-rumped, Yellow, Common Yellowthroat, Black-and-white, Magnolia, American Redstart and Wilson’s. It was a fun 1 hour with nice blue skies and mild temps of almost 50 at 8:00 am. Images are of males. Images were taken on May 18, 2014.

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Chestnut-sided Warbler

Binomial name: Setophaga pensyvanica

Category: Wood-Warblers

Size: 5” long, 7.75” wingspan

Weight: .34 oz.

Habitat: Open young second growth deciduous woodlands and woodland edges.

Diet: Insects and spiders, fruit and seeds occasionally

Nesting: The small cup shaped nest is usually located in the vertical fork of a shrub or vine tangle usually no higher than 2’ off the ground. The nest is of woven construction of weed and plant parts along with grasses and bark pieces. 3-5 cream colored with brown speckles are incubated for about 12 days.

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Warbler has a seed in the bill.

Warbler has a insect in the bill.

Warbler has just eaten the seed.

Warbler has just eaten the insect.

Warbler is going for the next insect.

Warbler is going for the next insect.

Warbler is grabbing the next insect off the branch.

Warbler is grabbing the next insect off the branch.

Warbler is eating that insect.

Warbler is eating that insect.

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About admin

Window to Wildlife features the photography of Jim Edlhuber. A lifelong native of Wisconsin, Jim has been photographing wildlife for 20 years. He considers himself an avid photographer and is always trying to capture nature and wildlife through his lens. He is in several photography clubs and has won numerous awards for his work. In recent years, Jim has focused mostly on birding photography and finds it to be the most challenging.

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