Cicada emerging from a nymph at Veteran’s Park in Milwaukee Wisconsin on August 7, 2016

I did some birding along the lakefront in Milwaukee this morning and after getting a couple glimpses of Yellow-crowned Night Herons I ran into Derek. We did some bird talking and as we did that, we noticed a Cicada, sometimes called a Dogday Harvestfly or Dogday Cicada, Tibicen canicularis, coming out of a nymph that was attached to Darek C’s backpack of all places. The skin splits on the nymph and the Cicada drops out. An amazing event watching this all take place over a period of time. It is said these nymphs live in the ground and whenever they come out, for whatever reason this event takes place. The Cicada can live from 2-4 weeks. After the Cicada leaves the nymph, it hangs there just like a butterfly out of the cocoon and drys off and things start happening with this creature. It made its way from the backpack, to a small branch, onto a leaf, then onto a log. It is amazing what is going on around us. Images from this event were taken on August 7, 2016.

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The nymph skin splits and the adult Cicada slowly pushes out. Here it is hanging on the back of the backpack.

Cicada, sometimes called Dogday Harvestfly or Dogday Cicada

Binomial name: Tibicen canicularis

Category: Annual Cicada

Size: 1″-1.25″ inches in length

Cool fact: The male Cicada makes the loud and complex sounds to attract females for mating.

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Hanging out drying and letting fluids move through the system

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Hanging out drying and letting fluids move through the system

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Hanging out drying and letting fluids move through the system

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Moving away from the nymph

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Onto a old leaf…

Onto a log...

Onto a log…

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End view

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When I left, it was just resting and probably waiting for time to pass to get out flying

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About admin

Window to Wildlife features the photography of Jim Edlhuber. A lifelong native of Wisconsin, Jim has been photographing wildlife for 20 years. He considers himself an avid photographer and is always trying to capture nature and wildlife through his lens. He is in several photography clubs and has won numerous awards for his work. In recent years, Jim has focused mostly on birding photography and finds it to be the most challenging.

2 Responses to Cicada emerging from a nymph at Veteran’s Park in Milwaukee Wisconsin on August 7, 2016

  1. Annie says:

    Wow it is amazing what happens right under our noses. Quit a different winged creature that doesn’t have feathers!!. Thanks for sharing

  2. Gerald Haiar says:

    Really cool and amazing. I have to start paying more attention when I am outside.

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