Rufous Hummingbird in Mayville Wisconsin on August 6, 2015

I made the trip up to Mayville Wisconsin with hopes to view the stunning male Rufous Hummingbird at the Herzmann’s residents. Amazingly, this is the second year for the same uncommon bird at this residents. It was banded last year, this years bird wearing the same number band. It showed about every 30-45 minutes today from about 6:30 am till 1:00 pm. It usually chased off other hummers after arriving at the feeder for nectar. This bird when finally at the feeder would typically feed for 4-5 seconds, back off a second, look around and go for more, usually 4-5 feeds. A big thank you to Liz and Matt Herzmann for allowing visitors to view this beautiful bird. I hope it hangs around for others to view. Will the bird return next year? With the nectar feeder under a tree, light was mixed and it made getting photos challenging. Images were taken on August 8, 2015.

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Rufous Hummingbird

Binomial name: Selasphorus rufus

Category: Hummingbirds

Description: Primarily rust-colored feathers with a small patch of white on the chest.  Red-orange patch on throat.   Short wings and a slender, slightly sloping bill.

Size: 2.8″-3.5″ long, 3” – 4” wingspan

Weight: 0.071 oz. – 0.18 oz

Habitat: Open broadleaf forests, orchards, meadows, parks, swamps, and yards

Natural Range: West Coast from Alaska to Mexico and Rocky Mountains, wintering in the Gulf Coast and Southeastern Atlantic states.  They are occasionally, although rarely, found in cold-weather areas such as the Midwest due to their surprising hardiness.

Diet: Tree and flower nectar, small insects, and hummingbird feeders

Nesting: The males may mate with several females but do not care for the young.  The female provides all parental care, building a nest in a protected tree or shrub.  They favor either deciduous or coniferous trees such as spruce, cedar, maples, pines, birch, and hemlocks.  The nest is made out of bud scales, lichen, spider silk, and dandelion or thistle down.  The same nest may be used year after year and not necessarily by its previous occupant. The female will lay 2-3 eggs at a time, laying 1 brood per summer.  She incubates the eggs for 15-17 days, and the young remain in the nest for 15-19 days.

Notes: This high-strung bird is considered extremely aggressive and will chase other animals from feeders or its nest including larger birds, chipmunks, and even other hummingbirds.  Like other hummingbirds, Roufus Hummingbirds are adept flyers and can hover, dart, and perch with ease.  They have even been seen to pluck insects out of midair.

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Ruby-throated Hummingbird

Ruby-throated Hummingbird, subadult male

Ruby-throated Hummingbird

Ruby-throated Hummingbird, female?

Ruby-throated Hummingbird

Ruby-throated Hummingbird, female?

Ruby-throated Hummingbird

Ruby-throated Hummingbird, female?

Ruby-throated Hummingbird

Ruby-throated Hummingbird, female?

Ruby-throated Hummingbird

Ruby-throated Hummingbird, female?

Ruby-throated Hummingbird

Ruby-throated Hummingbird, female?

Ruby-throated Hummingbird

Ruby-throated Hummingbird, female?

Ruby-throated Hummingbird

Ruby-throated Hummingbird, female?

Ruby-throated Hummingbird

Ruby-throated Hummingbird, female?

Ruby-throated Hummingbird

Ruby-throated Hummingbird, male subadult

Rufous Hummingbird at Black Earth Wisconsin October 26, 2014

Rufous Hummingbird, thought to be hatching year male. I received and email late morning from a friend in Black Earth Wisconsin who was pretty sure she had Rufous Hummingbird coming to her feeder. She sent me some great images and I thought I better check it out. I arrived around 1:30 pm. The bird came to the feeder within minutes after I arrived, I was hardly set up. The feeding was short and the bird feed on the opposite side of the feeder from where I was. I had notified Cynthia and she arrived a bit later. I the bird showed one more time briefly. We then had a good 2.5 hour lull with now bird. There was at least one other feeder at a neighbor’s house that Cynthia had spotted so who knows where the bird was hanging out. I got very few images of this bird. Thought to be confirming images to ID this bird were taken on October 27, 2014 by Kyle and Cynthia B. Thanks to Ann W. for contacting me about this bird. Hopefully the bird shows in the morning and continues for others to view. If the bird shows in the morning I will post Ann’s email address  and you can contact her. She is open to visitors to view this bird. It has been an exciting fall for me with vagrant hummingbirds as in the last 8 days I have viewed the 1- Anna’s, 3- Rufous. Images were taken on October 26, 2014 at Black Earth, Dane County Wisconsin.

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Rufous Hummingbird in Waukesha County Wisconsin on October 24, 2014

With a little sun this afternoon I decided to run out to Eagle in Waukesha County. I thought I would try for a couple more shots with some sun of the Rufous Hummingbird as I heard it is still being viewed. There was a small crowd of birders when I arrived. When I was there the Rufous was pretty consistent coming to the feeder. Those feedings were about every 25-30 minutes. When it showed, it gave nice views dipping into the feeder for nectar about 5 times, then off in a flash! Nobody ever really could follow to where it was perching. Birders came and went while I was there. Even though there have been a couple Rufous Hummingbirds in the last 2 years in the state, still a life bird for many that were present. All and all a beautiful day to be out birding with warm temps and nice sunshine. It was nice to see a few old birders and meet some new ones too. Thanks again to Danielle and Raef for being such nice hosts and allowing birders in to see this beauty on their property! Images were taken on October 24, 2014.

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Rufous Hummingbird

Binomial name: Selasphorus rufus

Category: Hummingbirds

Description: Primarily rust-colored feathers with a small patch of white on the chest.  Red-orange patch on throat.   Short wings and a slender, slightly sloping bill.

Size: 2.8″-3.5″ long, 3” – 4” wingspan

Weight: 0.071 oz. – 0.18 oz

Habitat: Open broadleaf forests, orchards, meadows, parks, swamps, and yards

Natural Range: West Coast from Alaska to Mexico and Rocky Mountains, wintering in the Gulf Coast and Southeastern Atlantic states.  They are occasionally, although rarely, found in cold-weather areas such as the Midwest due to their surprising hardiness.

Diet: Tree and flower nectar, small insects, and hummingbird feeders

Nesting: The males may mate with several females but do not care for the young.  The female provides all parental care, building a nest in a protected tree or shrub.  They favor either deciduous or coniferous trees such as spruce, cedar, maples, pines, birch, and hemlocks.  The nest is made out of bud scales, lichen, spider silk, and dandelion or thistle down.  The same nest may be used year after year and not necessarily by its previous occupant. The female will lay 2-3 eggs at a time, laying 1 brood per summer.  She incubates the eggs for 15-17 days, and the young remain in the nest for 15-19 days.

Notes: This high-strung bird is considered extremely aggressive and will chase other animals from feeders or its nest including larger birds, chipmunks, and even other hummingbirds.  Like other hummingbirds, Roufus Hummingbirds are adept flyers and can hover, dart, and perch with ease.  They have even been seen to pluck insects out of midair.

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Rufous Hummingbird in Waukesha County Wisconsin on October 23, 2014

This afternoon I received a message from a friend in Eagle Wisconsin that said she had a hummingbird coming to her feeder this morning that she did not recognize. She thought possible Rufous. I headed out there and Anne Morretti was right behind me when I arrived. She also heard the news.  The bird was there moments after we arrived on a feeder. She said she was just going to take the feeder down last Sunday but it had got put off. Danielle and Raef the property owners were anxious to find out what exact species this was. We took some photos as the sky turned grey and later rained pretty good. The Rufous continued to feed during the rain. We are assuming at this point it is a Rufous Hummingbird. I posted many images of the bird in hopes that we can ID it 100%. If anyone can call this bird something else or can find the marks to confirm it’s ID as a Rufous please let us know. I have seriously not studied the bird images yet myself as wanting to get the post up. The property owners are willing to let others in to view this beautiful bird well out it normal range. A big thank you to Danielle and Raef for getting the word out on this bird and letting others in to view it. They also had a beautiful leucistic Ruby-throated Hummingbird visit them last year, 2013 for a few days. 2 incredible birds coming to one residence.  I have included an image from that event at the bottom of these images. The Rufous Hummingbird images were taken on October 23, 2014. It was another exciting birding day with 3 vagrants in just 5 days! (I have recently added an image at the bottom here of the best tail spread I have. Is it enough to confirm this bird as a Rufous)?

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Rufous Hummingbird

Binomial name: Selasphorus rufus

Category: Hummingbirds

Description: Primarily rust-colored feathers with a small patch of white on the chest.  Red-orange patch on throat.   Short wings and a slender, slightly sloping bill.

Size: 2.8″-3.5″ long, 3” – 4” wingspan

Weight: 0.071 oz. – 0.18 oz

Habitat: Open broadleaf forests, orchards, meadows, parks, swamps, and yards

Natural Range: West Coast from Alaska to Mexico and Rocky Mountains, wintering in the Gulf Coast and Southeastern Atlantic states.  They are occasionally, although rarely, found in cold-weather areas such as the Midwest due to their surprising hardiness.

Diet: Tree and flower nectar, small insects, and hummingbird feeders

Nesting: The males may mate with several females but do not care for the young.  The female provides all parental care, building a nest in a protected tree or shrub.  They favor either deciduous or coniferous trees such as spruce, cedar, maples, pines, birch, and hemlocks.  The nest is made out of bud scales, lichen, spider silk, and dandelion or thistle down.  The same nest may be used year after year and not necessarily by its previous occupant. The female will lay 2-3 eggs at a time, laying 1 brood per summer.  She incubates the eggs for 15-17 days, and the young remain in the nest for 15-19 days.

Notes: This high-strung bird is considered extremely aggressive and will chase other animals from feeders or its nest including larger birds, chipmunks, and even other hummingbirds.  Like other hummingbirds, Roufus Hummingbirds are adept flyers and can hover, dart, and perch with ease.  They have even been seen to pluck insects out of midair.

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Leucistic Ruby-throated Hummingbird

Best tail spread I could come up with, is it enough to confrim this bird as a Rufous)?

Best tail spread I could come up with, is it enough to confirm this bird as a Rufous?

Rufous Hummingbird at Ft. Atkinson Wisconsin on October 19, 2014

I had a couple extra hours  today so I decided to make a run out to Ft. Atkinson in Jefferson County to see if the Rufous Hummingbird was still hanging around. It had been reported late morning so I thought I would give it a shot. The bird was present when I arrived and seemed to hang out in one specific tree in the yard each time after feeding. It gave nice views. On Monday when I view this bird it was out of sight after each feeding in a large spruce tree. It was well worth the trip. Also on tap was banding this bird. I have never viewed banding a bird so I thought it it was a great opportunity. On a second attempt they got the bird and banded. I was amazed at how fast the banding went and how professionally it was done. The bander Mickey and her assistant Jane made the job look like had been done 1 million times by them. Great job! Also present was Cynthia and Scott. It was nice to catch up on birding talk with them in the waiting time for the Rufous Hummingbird to appear. A big thank you to Cynthia for letting folks in to view this beautiful bird in her yard. I have included some images too of the banding that took place. Images were taken on October 19, 2014.

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Rufous Hummingbird

Binomial name: Selasphorus rufus

Category: Hummingbirds

Description: Primarily rust-colored feathers with a small patch of white on the chest.  Red-orange patch on throat.   Short wings and a slender, slightly sloping bill.

Size: 2.8″-3.5″ long, 3” – 4” wingspan

Weight: 0.071 oz. – 0.18 oz

Habitat: Open broadleaf forests, orchards, meadows, parks, swamps, and yards

Natural Range: West Coast from Alaska to Mexico and Rocky Mountains, wintering in the Gulf Coast and Southeastern Atlantic states.  They are occasionally, although rarely, found in cold-weather areas such as the Midwest due to their surprising hardiness.

Diet: Tree and flower nectar, small insects, and hummingbird feeders

Nesting: The males may mate with several females but do not care for the young.  The female provides all parental care, building a nest in a protected tree or shrub.  They favor either deciduous or coniferous trees such as spruce, cedar, maples, pines, birch, and hemlocks.  The nest is made out of bud scales, lichen, spider silk, and dandelion or thistle down.  The same nest may be used year after year and not necessarily by its previous occupant. The female will lay 2-3 eggs at a time, laying 1 brood per summer.  She incubates the eggs for 15-17 days, and the young remain in the nest for 15-19 days.

Notes: This high-strung bird is considered extremely aggressive and will chase other animals from feeders or its nest including larger birds, chipmunks, and even other hummingbirds.  Like other hummingbirds, Roufus Hummingbirds are adept flyers and can hover, dart, and perch with ease.  They have even been seen to pluck insects out of midair.

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Time to fly free!

 

 

Rufous Hummingbird at Ft. Atkinson Wisconsin on October 15, 2014

I got a tip on the hummingbird out in Ft. Atkinson, Jefferson Co. Wisconsin at a private residence. I had hoped to get some shots to help in the ID’ing this bird. Cynthia had some excellent shots of this bird. The bird has been confirmed as a female Rufous Hummingbird, Selasphorus rufus. I was there for a couple of hours and it was gloomy with light rain the whole time. I apologize for some of these images as they are not the best, but for ID purposes I put them up.   The bird hit the same feeder each time it came into the yard, which was under an overhang. I never saw the bird sit perched out in the open, probably because of the light rain that never stopped. One time after feeding I saw it fly into a large spruce tree, so it probably was hanging out in that tree under cover between feedings which were about every 30-45 minutes. This bird very seldom spread its tail feathers while I was present. Wow, what a beautiful bird! Thanks to who got the information out on this bird! Images were taken on October 15, 2014.

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Rufous Hummingbird

Binomial name: Selasphorus rufus

Category: Hummingbirds

Description: Primarily rust-colored feathers with a small patch of white on the chest.  Red-orange patch on throat.   Short wings and a slender, slightly sloping bill.

Size: 2.8″-3.5″ long, 3” – 4” wingspan

Weight: 0.071 oz. – 0.18 oz

Habitat: Open broadleaf forests, orchards, meadows, parks, swamps, and yards

Natural Range: West Coast from Alaska to Mexico and Rocky Mountains, wintering in the Gulf Coast and Southeastern Atlantic states.  They are occasionally, although rarely, found in cold-weather areas such as the Midwest due to their surprising hardiness.

Diet: Tree and flower nectar, small insects, and hummingbird feeders

Nesting: The males may mate with several females but do not care for the young.  The female provides all parental care, building a nest in a protected tree or shrub.  They favor either deciduous or coniferous trees such as spruce, cedar, maples, pines, birch, and hemlocks.  The nest is made out of bud scales, lichen, spider silk, and dandelion or thistle down.  The same nest may be used year after year and not necessarily by its previous occupant. The female will lay 2-3 eggs at a time, laying 1 brood per summer.  She incubates the eggs for 15-17 days, and the young remain in the nest for 15-19 days.

Notes: This high-strung bird is considered extremely aggressive and will chase other animals from feeders or its nest including larger birds, chipmunks, and even other hummingbirds.  Like other hummingbirds, Roufus Hummingbirds are adept flyers and can hover, dart, and perch with ease.  They have even been seen to pluck insects out of midair.

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If you care to view images of the Rufous Hummingbird that visited a private residence in Sheboygan Wisconsin October 27, 2013, please click here.

Rufous Hummingbird

Rufous Hummingbird photographed in Sheboygan, Wisconsin on October 27, 2013.

Rufous Hummingbird

Rufous Hummingbird

Binomial name: Selasphorus rufus

Category: Hummingbirds

Description: Primarily rust-colored feathers with a small patch of white on the chest.  Red-orange patch on throat.   Short wings and a slender, slightly sloping bill.

Size: 2.8″-3.5″ long, 3” – 4” wingspan

Weight: 0.071 oz. – 0.18 oz

Habitat: Open broadleaf forests, orchards, meadows, parks, swamps, and yards

Natural Range: West Coast from Alaska to Mexico and Rocky Mountains, wintering in the Gulf Coast and Southeastern Atlantic states.  They are occasionally, although rarely, found in cold-weather areas such as the Midwest due to their surprising hardiness.

Diet: Tree and flower nectar, small insects, and hummingbird feeders

Nesting: The males may mate with several females but do not care for the young.  The female provides all parental care, building a nest in a protected tree or shrub.  They favor either deciduous or coniferous trees such as spruce, cedar, maples, pines, birch, and hemlocks.  The nest is made out of bud scales, lichen, spider silk, and dandelion or thistle down.  The same nest may be used year after year and not necessarily by its previous occupant. The female will lay 2-3 eggs at a time, laying 1 brood per summer.  She incubates the eggs for 15-17 days, and the young remain in the nest for 15-19 days.

Notes: This high-strung bird is considered extremely aggressive and will chase other animals from feeders or its nest including larger birds, chipmunks, and even other hummingbirds.  Like other hummingbirds, Roufus Hummingbirds are adept flyers and can hover, dart, and perch with ease.  They have even been seen to pluck insects out of midair.

Rufous Hummingbird

Rufous Hummingbird

Rufous Hummingbird

Rufous Hummingbird

Rufous Hummingbird

To see the gallery of images, please click here.