Trail Cam Videos of Different Birds Coming to White-tailed Deer Insides Left in a Field in Wisconsin November 2019

Nothing goes to waste! Amazing what will show up on a trail cam if White-tailed Deer insides are left  in a field after dressing the animal. A friend offered me insides from a deer that he just shot with a bow.  I said why not. I set the insides in a field on some land in southern Wisconsin with a trial cam close by. I went home and came back up about a week later to check on it. Some nice video was captured of some beautiful birds. I feel some great video to educate anyone that does not realize what goes on when we are not around, nature takes care of a lot of things.

A list of videos of the different birds species below at each link:

Bald Eagle Adult video #1:  https://photos.google.com/share/AF1QipMn1ZOIREoIj4T2is2s8jhLCXIyLsoy9HeJR8bisUuP3ioMyseYscRI_Y_cz24z5Q/photo/AF1QipOZbuKBLwaOjKs6mgWvUoOQoRnynfFJg6gF0kxM?key=NXg0aWtLWUhVZUM3bGxZTWZVR2VJa1BTQ1ozQ3pB

 

Bald Eagle Adult video #2: https://photos.google.com/share/AF1QipPrN8rnuUkO01OvobJo9b6TtwwavO8yI0P4xcihmmZigWF1WHcRfTi8OFQRa2RQeQ?key=cERadW96Q09HeTI3RkJqX1F6SjVoUmgycVp6eDRB

 

Bald Eagle 3rd year video #1: https://photos.google.com/share/AF1QipPBrmYLwu6b6hQsMJXv-k_OnvLvfm9L5mikStYZWQ4Fu9dxPx2UQZmtTA8UgOIJJw/photo/AF1QipPgL7UHhRzbre33rcti0ffpBwTOccZ4oCUQrG9a?key=QU5nbGxmcGhmU1hwNDVKT1BKSEtmVDdqRV9KUTdn

 

Bald Eagle 3rd year video #2 https://photos.google.com/share/AF1QipP-Gd382w7ql9oJmmKj6TC3NXWkOCEN9Ozsq9AeEmI2sTehab4wOXj7HyAgi4F8Ew/photo/AF1QipMK-uST1zrhR2LWN1pnqs–G0Ih3n5kKmE2xL4O?key=YjVJWkVIVHp5VTJrdGtmRTZ6bGJWcGZKNS1Tc2R3

 

Rough-legged Hawk video #1: https://photos.google.com/share/AF1QipO_k8lEDVqS-KJz51L6Q3rkXJQXDPTrPdOmOJy64X8HkR_r9J4LJZUpbRrIM-MCdA/photo/AF1QipOdSsX0BE2LWyZ-t-5jbO-5GwSu2m_W1tznTqmc?key=Rkl0MWo3TnhfX05tN3VYMmVXeHBTczREcnZFOTZB

 

Rough-legged Hawk video #2:https://photos.google.com/share/AF1QipMQgmA7CEYovhe_-9Jq56WWxOLhRnnBQsImcQQ2-p4_wVhu3R41mpEDMTzvIJ-uuw/photo/AF1QipNts1poIOTCU6xMB6mnGnXEP5BJiBAmgAzZDEJc?key=R01oSVRXb3ZYa21BRHFzS3dsX3JIdXY4Y0pOb05B

 

American Crows video #1: https://photos.google.com/share/AF1QipPCXQ7-tfgakyeZnSkr9jel1aqrD1cTngZDumIk9OsNW4IZLmwmiojeyba0g3Xrrg/photo/AF1QipNtsaqrAn5DgDO0vLCurh5fIBpe2NpZjR7z_jfN?key=X1JEZkJGc0lWbnBTVkVnVnFQSWQ5dHROVW9INGRB

 

American Crows video #2: https://photos.google.com/share/AF1QipNpHS9hFCLbkveWHDKfWuvh84-H1hMEE5ZQyO1wT2FzoifCpH-y1wlu4eYXz_Qh_g/photo/AF1QipPLdnrqGazVzc6feUtGMJKe8y3-YCQa1qT9eFmO?key=eXVTMF95djFnX1Q1akh2Uk00WU5fS05vcDJMR2lB

 

Downy Woodpecker stand up to a Blue Jay video #1: https://photos.google.com/share/AF1QipO26SpHLhncDQjcpSaavk7NALukkPGxPymlIkepEZ_fXl_OffzJMDpj5b-qmuHqqA/photo/AF1QipPq70_fd0j5A1ESjerwTxtQbFbLNnmfyaCGSRsk?key=WU1LTDlaR2xOSWVnMkU3a0dScGRWaGc4MlVfQmhB

 

Blue Jays video #1: https://photos.google.com/share/AF1QipNW2tR5I9KMS_t2dfWPHx2PQTu5o8eubREEgWWgfD3Mt9x3dnj5LVT-2jOf5btpdw/photo/AF1QipMH4lCNoNjwYPIb5CLt5jnv4DzolzFJEiWM5UU8?key=WGVYc1hYR3gzaDNzd1hwVUktQW5acUFOZDJsVWhn

Fall Colors of the Porcupine Mountains Wilderness State Park on October 7, 2019

A tour of fall colors on a road trip at the Porcupine Mountain Wilderness State Park in Michigan’s UP provided some of the most stunning fall colors ever witnessed. It was only a one day tour for a few hours on a day I would have called PEAK season for colors. Images were taken on October 7, 2019.

“Lake of the Clouds” at Porcupine Mountains Wildness State Park

Lake of the Clouds

Lake Superior in a distance…

Looking east…

En route, just a roadside pond…

En route, pond with a stream…

Lake of the Clouds

 

Mississippi Kite in Wisconsin on August 16, 2019

After a tip from a friend about a Mississippi Kite here in Wisconsin, I decided to check it out. I arrived early and found this male bird perched in a dead tree in the area it might be found. I watched it for awhile as it repeatedly went for large flying insects and dragonflies or it perched. It preened a lot and when it was not preening it just remained perched looking for something to eat. Once I saw it fly and could see why it got the name “kite”. The bird was trying to get something on the side of a leafed out deciduous tree and it was flying like a kite would look, both top of the wings facing me, make like small radius’s in a figure-eight. Pretty cool to see! Obviously a life bird. Sorry, I can not share this location. The early morning started out cloudy but soon gave way to some sunshine. Images were taken on August 16, 2019.

The Mississippi Kite is found perched in a tree after looking sometime for it…

The Mississippi leaves the perch and does some flying around in the area, always looking for things to eat…

Always searching for food…

Must have excellent vision as it went for an insect about 500 feet away from the perch at the bottom of tree…

Cruising low in search of things to eat…

Close by overhead…

Returning to the perch, it flies over me…

After some time the Mississippi Kite returns to the area…soaring low, always looking for something to eat…

Searching…

Searching…

Off a ways in search of…

A pass over me…

Soaring around the area…

Here the bird appears to be onto something that I could not see.

Sailbirding at the Milwaukee Community Sailing Center in Milwaukee Wisconsin on August 21, 2019

Another opportunity came up for me to get on a Sailbirding adventure at the Milwaukee Community Sailing Center and I did not pass it up.  It was a beautiful day, low winds to start with mostly sunny skies. Sailor Carl Eisenberg lead the group with excellent birders Jennifer Ambrose and Lorri Howski, along with myself. We headed out and had a heck of a great time! 10 species of birds seen along with breakwall. I don’t have numbers on each species but there were large numbers of Double-crested Cormorants and Caspian Terns along with gulls. Species seen were Sanderlings, Great Blue Heron, Least Sandpiper, Double crested Cormorants, Caspian Terns,  Herring Gulls, Spotted Sandpiper and Ring-billed Gulls were some.

NOTE: The purpose of this sailbirding trip today was to document bird species on a portion of the breakwaters (breakwall to some). This portion of the breakwall has been changed by the Army Corps of Engineering by strategically adding smaller rocks to the giant ones along the breakwall structure. The Army Corps has collaborated with UWM with hopes to create breakwall habitat for a variety of living creatures including birds.

On the way out to do some awesome Sailbirding!

Double-crested Cormorants, juveniles

Caspian Terns, juveniles with lighter color heads…

A Great Blue Heron flying around way out…

Least Sandpiper

Sanderling on the breakwall…

Least Sandpiper…

Caspian Terns juveniles…the stretch…

Caspian Tern juvenile

Double-crested Cormorant, juvenile

Herring Gull

Sanderling

Sanderling

Herring Gull, juvenile

Double -crested Cormorant just up from fishing…

The sailor Carl Eisenberg, it was smooth sailing as they say!

Jennifer taking a break after counting all those birds!

Lorri still in search of that rare bird!

Jim just looking for something different!

The skyline…

The Sailbirding group today!

Great Wisconsin Birdathon 2019 at Lake Park Milwaukee Wisconsin on June 5, 2019

It was an exciting morning birding with friends to help raise money for the Great Wisconsin Birdathon. The team I was part of was Jen’s Warbler Warriors. Teammates Jennifer Rutten – captain, with Carl Eisenberg, Carl Swartz, Marilyn Bontly, Helen Bolgrien, Karen Johnson, Jack Coulter, Amanda, Norma Zehner and myself. 44 species found, not bad for a June day at a city park! Nice $$ raised for the Great Wisconsin Birdathon! It was a beautiful morning out looking for our feather friends, with full sun, little wind and mild temps. Images were taken on June 5, 2019.

Downy Woodpecker male feeding young…

Eastern Bluebird, male

House Wren working on nest building…

High up Great-crested Flycatcher…

Part of the team in search of…

In search of birds…

Before the walk…

A little pep talk…

Some of the teammates at the start…

 

Wisconsin Bird Quiz #1 ~ On Bird Habitat, Food, Description, misc on April 18, 2019

Give this Wisconsin bird quiz at try! It may be easy or it may be difficult. I have gotten requests for more quizzes and quizzes of this type. There are 50 images making that 25 matches. To try this quiz, I suggest a paper and pencil. Write down e.g. images #1 and #14 seem to be a match or have something in common, etc. When you are finished check with the answers below. If you come across something that appears to be incorrect, please let me know. This quiz is the first of it’s kind so feed back is appreciated if possible.  Thank you

Answers are below the images, have fun!

 

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ANSWERS

 

 1  –  49

2  –  38

3  –  20

4  –  50

5  –  18

6  –  42

7  – 14

8  –  21

9  –  41

10  –  45

11  –  36

12  –  48

13  –  23

15  –  30

16  –  27

17  –  24

19  –  32

22  –  33

25  –  35

26  –  39

28  –  40

29  –  43

31  –  44

34  –  46

37  –  47

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Image Description

1 – Canada Goose eggs in nest

2 – Bobolink

3 – Yellow-bellied Sapsucker

4 – Building roof top where gulls nest, breeding habitat

5 – American Avocet

6 – Great Horned Owl

7 – Cedar berries – Townsend’s Solitaire food

8 – Cooper’s Hawk nest

9 – Cattle Egret – cows in a field, sometimes Cattle Egrets are seen with cows in a field, habitat

10 – Bald Eagle

11 – Common Redpoll

12 – Yellow-rumped Warbler

13 – Greater Scaup – bill, wide black mark on bill tip

14 – Townsend’s Solitaire

15 – House Wren

16 – Killdeer habitat, gravel area nesting

17 – Red-winged Blackbird

18 – American Avocet

19 – Lesser Scaup

20 – Yellow-bellied Sapsucker – access holes for sap allowing the bird to get sap

21 – Cooper’s Hawk

22 – Green Heron chick

23 – Greater Scaup

24 – Red-winged Blackbird – habitat

25 – Wild Turkey head

26 – Chimney Swift

27 – Killdeer in snow

28 – Northern Saw whet Owl habitat – one actually found here in this tree by a little girl at the arboretum in Madison

29 – Open cage – Was told bird species escaped from a bird store in Chicago

30 – House Wren – brush pile habitat

31 – Snowy Owl

32 – Lesser Scaup – bill, narrow black nail on end of bill

33 – Green Heron

34 – Barred Owl

35 – Wild Turkey nest with eggs

36 – Common Redpoll – alder cones seeds what they eat

37 – Ruby-throated Hummingbird

38 – Bobolink – field habitat where they might be found

39 – Chimney – Chimney Swift habitat

40 – Northern Saw whet Owl

41 – Cattle Egret

42 – Great Horned Owl – owlets

43 – European Goldfinch

44 – Snowy Owl – Snow plies where they might be found in winter

45 – Bald Eagle nest

46 – Barred Owl tail

47 – Ruby-throated Hummingbird nest

48 – Yellow-rumped Warbler – yellow patch on back, sometimes this bird is called butter butt

49 – Canada Geese flying by

50 – Ring-billed Gull with grass for nesting material

Sparrow ID Quiz ~ test your yourself on these beautiful birds here in Wisconsin!

Sparrow ID Quiz ~ test your yourself on these beautiful birds that can be found sometime during the year here in Wisconsin! With the other bird ID Quizzes going over well, and many requests for a Sparrow ID quiz, I have put one together. All images were taken by me and photographed here in Wisconsin. Answers are below last photo at the bottom of the page. There is a chance you may see some color variation in sparrows considering sex, age or time of year. There are books, FB groups, phone apps, classes to lean more. There are also presentations to help in learning bird ID, look for details at your local nature center. Special Note: I have complied a list of 18 species, there are 20 images, as I have an image of both the male and female House Sparrow. This quiz may not be as easy as the other quizzes! See how well you do, have fun too!

#1

#2

#3

#4

#5

#6

#7

#8

#9

#10

#11

#12

#13

#14

#15

#16

#17

#18

#19

#20

 

ANSWERS BELOW

#1 – White-crowned Sparrow

#2 – Fox Sparrow

#3 – Savannah Sparrow

#4 – Field Sparrow

#5 – American Tree Sparrow

#6 – House Sparrow – Male

#7 – Song Sparrow

#8 – Henslow’s Sparrow      – Retzer Nature Center

#9 – Lincoln’s Sparrow

#10 – Chipping Sparrow

#11 – Le Conte’s Sparrow     – Magic Hedge

#12 – Lark Sparrow     – Lake Park

#13 – Nelson’s Sharp-tailed Sparrow     – Magic Hedge

#14 – White-throated Sparrow

#15 – Harris’s Sparrow     – Retzer Nature Center

#16 – Vesper Sparrow     – Marquette County

#17 – Clay-colored Sparrow

#18 – House Sparrow – Female

#19 – Grasshopper Sparrow     – Magic Hedge

#20 – Swamp Sparrow

Ducks, Grebes, and Geese ID Quiz ~ test your yourself on these beautiful birds here in Wisconsin!

Ducks, Grebes, and Geese ID Quiz ~ test your yourself on these beautiful birds that can be found sometime during the year here in Wisconsin! There are 50 images, see how well you do. Answers are below last photo at the bottom of the page. There is a chance you may see some color variation in ducks, grebes, or geese considering sex, age or time of year. There are books, FB groups, phone apps, classes to lean more. There are also presentations to help in learning bird ID, look for details at your local nature center. All photos were taken in Wisconsin except the Wood Ducks and the female Green-winged Teal images. Please let me know if you see an error, thank you. Special Note: I have complied a list of 50 images of ducks, grebes, and geese. I am missing a few of the images for various reasons, sorry. This quiz may not be as easy as the warbler or shorebird quiz! So don’t look for these in the quiz as they are missing: American Black Duck fm, Northern Pintail fm, Barrow’s Goldeneye fm, Common Mergansers.

Ducks

# 1

# 2

# 3   Narrow black nail, and not the wide black on the tip of the bill tells you it is a?

# 4

# 5

# 6  Narrow black nail, and not the wide black on the tip of the bill tells you it is a?

# 7

# 8

# 9

# 10

# 11

# 12

# 13

# 14

# 15

# 16 left —— # 17 right

# 18

# 19 female —– # 20 male

# 21

# 22

# 23

# 24

# 25

# 26 – assuming this is a female, what species?

# 27

# 28

# 29

# 30

# 31   A rare vistor

# 32

# 33

# 34

# 35

# 36

# 37

# 38

#39

#40

 Grebes

# 41

# 42

# 43

# 44    White tip on the bill means it is a…

# 45

Geese

# 46

# 47

# 48

# 49

# 50

ANSWERS BELOW

Ducks

#1 – Mallard – male

#2 – Northern Shoveler – male

#3 –Lesser Scaup – male

#4 – Canvasback – female

#5 – Redhead – male

#6 – Lesser Scaup – female

# 7 – Bufflehead – male

#8 – Wood Duck – female

#9 – Long-tailed Duck – male

#10 – Canvasback – male

#11 – Redhead – female

#12 – Northern Shoveler – female

#13 – Ring-necked Duck – female

#14 – Bufflehead – female

#15 – Ring-necked Duck – male

#16 – Eurasian Wigeon – male

#17 – American Wigeon – male

#18 – Harlequin Duck – male

#19 – Gadwall – female

#20 – Gadwall – male

#21 – Blue-winged Teal – female

#22 – Blue-winged Teal – male

#23 – Greater Scaup – male

#24 – Red-breasted Merganser – female

#25 – Common Goldeneye – female

#26 – Hooded Merganser – female

#27 –Ruddy Duck – female

#28 – Red-breasted Merganser – male

#29 – Greater Scaup – female

#30 – Wood Duck – male

#31 – Cinnamon Teal – male

#32 – Green-winged Teal – female

#33 – Hooded Merganser – male

#34 – Green-winged Teal – male

#35 – Common Goldeneye – male

#36 – Barrow’s Goldeneye – male

#37 – Ruddy Duck – male

#38 – Long-tailed Duck – female

#39 – Mallard – female

#40 – American Black Duck, male

Grebes

#41 – Pied-billed Grebe

#42 – Western Grebe

#43 – Eared Grebe

#44 – Horned Grebe

#45 – Red-necked Grebe

Geese

#46 – Snow Goose

#47 – Canada Goose

#48 – Greater White-fronted Goose

#49 – Ross’s Goose

#50 – Cackling Goose

Shorebird ID Quiz ~ test your yourself before these beautiful birds arrive here in Wisconsin this spring!

Shorebird ID Quiz ~ test your yourself before these beautiful birds arrive here in Wisconsin this spring! 32 species, see how well you do. All shorebirds below were photographed in Wisconsin. Answers are below last photo at the bottom of the page. There is a chance you may see some color variation in shorebirds considering sex, age or time of year. There are books, FB groups, phone apps, classes to lean more. There are also presentations to help in learning bird ID, look for details at your local nature center. Special Note: I have complied a list of 35 shorebirds you might see in Wisconsin. I am missing 3 of those images for various reasons, sorry. This quiz may not be as easy as the warbler quiz! So don’t look for these in the quiz as they are missing: Solitary Sandpiper, Hudsonian Godwit, and Long-billed Dowitcher.

# 1

#2

#3

#4

#5

#6

#7

#8

#9

#10

#11

#12

#13

#14

#15

#16

#17

#18

#19

#20

#21

#22

#23

#24

#25

#26

#27

#28

#29

#30

#31

#32

ANSWERS BELOW

 

#1 – Buff-breasted Sandpiper

#2 – American Woodcock

#3 – American Avocet

#4 – Black-belled Plover

#5 – Short-billed Dowitcher

#6 – Purple Sandpiper

# 7 – Marbled Godwit

#8 – Whimbrel

#9 – Killdeer

#10 – Semipalmated Plover

#11 – Dunlin

#12 – Sanderling

#13 – Upland Sandpiper

#14 – Ruddy Turnstone

#15 – Western Sandpiper

#16 – Red Phalarope

#17 – Lesser Yellowlegs

#18 – Greater Yellowlegs

#19 – Black-necked Stilts

#20 – Willets

#21 – Red Knot

#22 – Wilson’s Phalarope

#23 – Pectoral Sandpiper

#24 – Semipalmated Sandpiper

#25 – Baird’s Sandpiper

#26 – Wilson’s Snipe

#27 – Spotted Sandpiper

#28 – Stilt Sandpiper

#29 – Least Sandpiper

#30 – Piping Plove

#31 – American Golden-Plover

#32 – White-rumped Sandpiper

Warbler ID Quiz ~ test your yourself before these beautiful birds arrive here in Wisconsin this spring!

Warbler ID Quiz ~ test your yourself before these beautiful birds arrive here in Wisconsin this spring! 28 species, see how well you do. All warblers below were photographed in Wisconsin. Answers are below last photo at the bottom of the page. There is a chance you may see some color variation in warblers considering sex, age or time of year. There are books, FB groups, phone apps, classes to lean more. There are also presentations to help in learning bird ID, look for details at your local nature center.

#1 ~ tail bobbs

#2

#3

#4

#5 ~ usually found lower

#6

#7

#8 ~ also called butter butt

#9 ~ usually seen on the ground picking through leaves, etc

#10

#11

#12 ~ can be seen on the bank of a lake, river or creek, seen near water…

#13

#14

#15

#16

#17

#18

#19

#20

#21

#22

#23 ~ not common in our area

#24

#25

#26

#27

#28

ANSWERS BELOW

 

#1 – Palm Warbler

#2 – Black-and-white Warbler

#3 – Magnolia Warbler

#4 – Northern Parula

#5 – Common Yellowthroat

#6 – Black-throated Blue Warbler

#7 – Nashville Warbler

#8 – Yellow-rumped Warbler

#9 – Worm-eating Warbler

#10 – Black-throated Green Warbler

#11 – Blackpoll Warbler

#12 – Prothonotary Warbler

#13 – Cape May Warbler

#14 – Chestnut -sided Warbler

#15 – Yellow Warbler

#16 – Wilson’s Warbler

#17 – Blackburnian Warbler

#18 – Orange-crowned Warbler

#19 – Hooded Warbler

#20 – Mourning Warbler

#21 – Canada Warbler

#22 – Tennesse Warbler

#23 – Prairie Warbler

#24 – Ovenbird

#25 – Golden-winged Warbler

#26 – Kirtland’s Warbler

#27 – American Redstart

#28 – Pine Warbler

Great Tit at Indian Mound Park in Sheboygan Wisconsin on March 8, 2019

With birding being some what slow, I decided it was time to try for the Great Tit. A bird I have always wanted to see and get on my life list even though it is not a countable bird at this time. I went for it thinking it will be added to the list sooner than later. It happened today after almost a 4 hour wait. There are several locations to try to see the Great Tit , but I also wanted to get a picture of it too. I made the run to Kohler-Andrae State Park first. I stood at the feeders by the ranger station for the first hour plus and it was Pine Siskins, both Nuthatches, American Tree Sparrows and the common feeder birds present. They had recently reported the Great Tit there so I thought I had a good chance. I felt it was time to go to my next location which was Indian Mound Park in Sheboygan. I walked the park almost from end to end very quietly looking for any movement of birds. It was just Black-capped Chickadee’s, both nuthatches and a small flock of American Robins came in to bath as there was some open water in the low areas. I think I was there over an hour. I went back to KASP again also driving the park, and spending some time at the feeder, nothing new. I went back to Indian Mound Park for the last time and spent another hour there. Just about ready to leave for the day and I spot what I thought was the Great Tit ~150 feet high in a tree. I put my bins on it and it flew and landed on a tree a few feet away from me. I was on a walking path at the time, I think it was checking me out. I could not get a shot as it was right above me so I slowly walked away. Looking back I was about 20 feet away, I took a couple shots and off it went. I hung around another 15-20 minutes hoping it would return but it did not. Harrington Beach is suppose to be a good place to see this bird too. So a life bird but not countable, like the European Goldfinch. The day started out at 7 degrees but warmed up fast with the full sun. No wind, it was quiet as a mouse everywhere I went. Images were taken on March 8, 2019.

Great Tit, looks like it just took a drink of water…

Great Tit

Binomial name: Passer montanus

Size: 5.5” long, 9”-10″ wing span

Weight: .57 oz

Note: The Great Tit is pretty common in Europe, but so far Wisconsin is the only state in the US where nesting populations have been found of this pet shop escapee.

Great Tit

Rock Lake Icehenge in Lake Mills Wisconsin on January 29, 2019

I got text late last night from a friend that the “Icehenge” on Rock Lake has returned in 2019. This location is on Rock Lake in Lake Mills Wisconsin. I thought for sure today I was up doing a photo op in Antarctica with the day starting at -9F with a high of a -6F winds were 30 mph plus! The Icehenge, what an awesome piece of art and put together well by a group of local artists and craftsmen. It was similar to the Icehenge the group put up in the years 2015 and 2016. The ice for the Icehenge was actually cut near the structure, dragged over to the site and the upper pieces muscled up on top. There is a small structure that is put up near Icehenge a couple hundred feet away called an “altar”. Images of the altar are below. When standing in the middle of the Icehenge as the sun sets on a day very soon, the sun should set on the top of the altar and light should point to the middle of the Icehenge location. I was told this a couple years ago, the math was done on this, and if that actually happens is yet to be seen. It was a fun photo op for a few minutes on a cold and windy day with temps starting at -9F, the high for the day there was -6F out on the lake. Thanks Paula for the text! Images were taken on January 29, 2019.

The “Icehenge” as it looked today around noon!

The “Alter” way out…

As the snow blew…

When I arrived things were calm…

The Icehenge with the altar off in a distance…

Sailbirding at the Milwaukee Community Sailing Center in Milwaukee Wisconsin on October 12, 2018

The third Sailbirding trip of the season was made from the Milwaukee Community in Milwaukee this afternoon. Two sail boats were taken out and it was an exciting time for all! Bird counts in the study area were: 60 Double-crested Cormorants, 29 Ring-billed Gulls, 21 Herring Gulls. Out of the study, the control area just south along the breakwall, the bird of the day was a Lesser Black-backed Gull, along with 25 Herring Gulls, 22 Ring-billed Gulls and 41 Double-creasted Cormorants. Some other nice birds seen on our way out to the study area were 2 Sanderlings and a Surf Scoter.  Some nice algae was present along the breakwall too. Participants on this sailbirding run included in sail boat #1, sailor and birder Carl Eisenberg, Jennifer Rutten, and Drew Shuster. In sailboat #2, sailor and birder Helen Bolgrien, Jym Mooney and I. It was a mostly cloudy day with a couple minutes of sun, winds around 10-12 mph. Images were taken on October 12, 2018.

NOTE: The purpose of this sailbirding trip today was to document bird species on a portion of the breakwaters (breakwall to some). This portion of the breakwall has been changed by the Army Corps of Engineering by strategically adding smaller rocks to the giant ones along the breakwall structure. The Army Corps has collaborated with UWM with hopes to create breakwall habitat for a variety of living creatures including birds. Announced today, Schlitz Audubon Nature Center is backing the Sailbirding Citizen Science!

Sailing out to the study area to do some sailbirding…

Approaching the study area, gulls were just flushed, we don’t know why…

The study area on the breakwall from the lighthouse right to where the rocks get larger…

Double-crested Cormorants in the study area…

Herring Gulls in the study area…

The other sailbirders looking intense for what birds they might see with sailor and birder Carl Eisenberg…

A Ring-billed Gull does a stretch in the study area…

The sailboat I am on, we are all counting birds and species…

Jym looks through his bins, looking for something different out there!

A Double-crested Cormorant does a flyover by the study area…

 

Sailor and birder Helen Bolgrien…she did an amazing job with the sailboat!

Bird of the day, a Lesser Black-backed Gull, with a darker back, in the control area…

Gulls galore!

A Herring Gull looks to the left in the control area…

Another view of the study area from the south…

Ring-billed Gulls loafing…

A wave to us from the other sailbirders…

Sailbirding north, the other sailbirders are in front of us…

2 Sanderlings seen on the way out to the study area feeding along the harbor rock wall…

Herring Gull coming in for a landing in the control area…

Sailbirding group…

American Pipits on the Milwaukee Lakefront on October 5, 2018

Birding the Milwaukee lakefront in the rain and mist this morning gave surprising views of American Pipits. Hitting the beaches for the second time I found an American Pipit at the north end of Bradford Beach. Birding Veterans Park near the Milwaukee Community Sailing Center I found 8 American Pipits near the parking area. Cars coming and going had them flushed all over the place but I did manage a few images before they starting moving south out of that area. All birds I observed appeared to be eating well, moths, gnats and other insects. It was a rainy misty morning that never let up up, temps were chilly with a stiff wind of Lake Michigan. Images were taken on October 5, 2018.

The American Pipit at Bradford Beach…The tail was always bobbing up and down, a characteristic of this species…

American Pipit

Binomial name: Anthus rubescens

Category: Sandpipers, Phalaropes, and Allies

Size: 6.5” long, 10.5” wing span

Weight: .74 Oz.

Note: Pipits are found on all continents, except Antarctica

The American Pipit finding things to eat…

Searching the beach area this bird found plenty to eat…

A look back…

This bird moved fast along the beach area picking through debris and finding things to eat…

American Pipit in the grass, 1 of 8 at the Milwaukee Community Sailing Center at Veterans Park…

Moving through the grass area in search of food…

This one catches a large moth..

And eats it…

More things to eat…

Looking around…

A beautiful bird!

A pair of American Pipits off a ways looking for and getting things to eat…

Sailbirding at the Milwaukee Community Sailing Center in Milwaukee Wisconsin on September 28, 2018

The second Sailbirding trip was made from the Milwaukee Community in Milwaukee this afternoon. It was an exciting time for all! Bird counts in the study area were: 1 Ruddy Turnstone being the highlight, 1 Sanderling, 30 Double-crested Cormorants, 40 Ring-billed Gulls, 25 Herring Gulls, 2 Mallards and 2 Sparrow spp. Out of the study area a Peregrine Falcon and  30 American Coots were located near the breakwall. Some nice algae was present along the breakwall too. Participants on this sailbirding run included in sail boat #1, sailor Carl Eisenberg, Jennifer Rutten, and myself. In sailboat #2, sailor Helen Bolgrien, Ann Lowrey and Jym Mooney. It was a cloudy day with some puffs, winds around 14 mph. Images were taken on September 28, 2018.

NOTE: The purpose of this sailbirding trip today was to document bird species on a portion of the breakwaters (breakwall to some). This portion of the breakwall has been changed by the Army Corps of Engineering by strategically adding smaller rocks to the giant ones along the breakwall structure. The Army Corps has collaborated with UWM with hopes to create breakwall habitat for a variety of living creatures including birds.

Sailing out to the breakwall to count birds present in the study area set up by the Army Corps of Engineering…

Ruddy Turnstone, bird of the trip in the study area!

Ruddy Turnstone

Double-crested Cormorant

Herring Gull

Ring-billed Gull

Sailbirding sailboat #2 checking out the breakwall…

Sailbirding boat #2 looking and counting with sailor Helen…

Another image of the study area were smaller and flatter rocks have been set for species habitat…

Sailor Carl at the controls of sailboat #1 with sailboat #2 in the background…

Jennifer with intense looks at the breakwall for bird species as we approach it…

Sailbirding group…

Sora at Lakeshore State Park in Milwaukee Wisconsin on May 7, 2018

Birding along the lakefront in Milwaukee today, a stop at Lakeshore State Park provided nice views of a Sora. It came out of the cattails a couple of times to do some feeding. At first I thought it was an American Coot, seeing only the front of the head in the dark, but then, yes and Sora! It was a beautiful spring day with perfect temps, sunny skies with low winds.

Sora

Sora

Binomial name: Porzana carolina

Category: Rails, Gallinules, and Coots

Size: 8.75” long, 14” wingspan

Weight: 2.6 Oz

Note: Member of the rail family

Coming out through the cattails…

Looking for something to eat…

Going for something here…

Looking for food…

edible…?

The Sora drops it…

It went for something….

Walking around, looking for something to eat…

Finds something on the rock, but it does not take it…

Leaves it…

Back to the water…

Dives for something…

Has something here…

Eats it…

Opossum at a Milwaukee County Park on January 14, 2018

At one of county parks in Milwaukee today, I spotted this cute Opossum. It was eating what appeared to be small scraps of food maybe that were in a parking area. Eating appeared to be a high priority as it did not seem to mind me parked in my car taking a few photos. After a few minutes it went over a rocky edge and disappeared out of sight. Images were taken on January 14, 2018.

Our feathered friends in Marquette County Wisconsin on November 9, 2017

A closer look at some of our beautiful feather friends that we see almost daily in the winter. Just had a little fun photographing some of them today. Images were taken in Marquette County Wisconsin on November 9, 2017

Blue Jay, all eyes…

Black-capped Chickadee, just after landing…

Blue Jay, a wet bill from just getting a drink…

Dark-eyed Junco, just showing off…

Blue Jay, look at those beautiful feathers!

White-breasted Nuthatch

Blue Jay, wet bill from the big drink…

Black-capped Chickadee, perched pretty…

Blue Jay, the early morning sun just peeping through…

Red-breasted Nuthatch

Black-capped Chickadee with the blowing wind…

Black-capped Chickadee

Blue Jay, a little bit of a surprise to see me…

Dark-eyed Junco

Black-capped Chickadee

Short-eared Owl at Lakeshore State Park in Milwaukee Wisconsin on October 28, 2017

Doing some birding along the lakefront in Milwaukee, the highlight this morning was a beautiful Short-eared Owl that took flight at Lakeshore State Park when some walkers flushed it near to where I was. The owl flew off but then returned a couple minutes later. It gave nice views but I looked away for a moment and then back and it was gone. I never saw it leave or where it went. Another bird to note for the morning was a beautiful Glaucous Gull far out from Bradford Beach, the first sighting of the fall that I know of on the Milwaukee lakefront. It was hanging with ~100 Red-breasted Mergansers. I returned a little later and none of the above species were present. It was a pretty cold morning with stiff winds out of the NW, cloudy skies. Still a fun morning out birding. Images were taken on October 28, 2017.

Short-eared Owl, looking over the area after a return flight from out on the big lake…

Short-eared Owl

Binomial name: Asio flammeus

Category: Typical Owls

Size: 15” long, 38” wing span

Weight: 12 oz

Note: Breeds in parts of  northern and southern Canada and all of Alaska in the summer. Winters in parts of the midwest, southern US and both east and west coast of the US.

Short-eared Owl, coming back to shore after a flight out over the water…

Short-eared Owl, looking over the area after a return flight from out on the big lake…

Just looking around…

Glaucous Gull, 2nd cycle out from Bradford Beach

The Cup Plant, wildflowers on wildflowers on August 6, 2017

With cloudy weather today and a good chance of rain I decided to try my luck at some Cup Plant in the yard. These plants are currently about 5-8 feet tall. Images were taken on August 6, 2017.

Cup Plant, Silphium perfoliatum

Most occasions the leaf cup holds water at the start of the day, birds frequent this plant for a drink…

The Cup Plant with Meadow Phlox in the background…

The Cup Plant with Royal Catchfly in the back ground